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The heroine of Prey, Naru, is played by Amber Midthunder. David Bukach/Hulu hide caption

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David Bukach/Hulu

How a Grammy-winning Pueblo musician influenced the soundtrack for 'Prey'

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Ari Leff a.k.a. Lauv Lauren Dunn/Ari Leff hide caption

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Lauren Dunn/Ari Leff

Lauv longs for the happiness of childhood on 'All 4 Nothing'

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What Wild Up unearths on Julius Eastman, Vol. 2: Joy Boy is more than just music, it's a set of relations and modes of comporting in the world that risk trading fleeting, worldly praise to regain the eternal soul. Ron Hammond hide caption

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Ron Hammond

Amanda Shires' new album, Take It Like a Man, is her finest release, encapsulating much of what makes Shires an artist deserving of the word "singular." Michael Schmelling/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Michael Schmelling/Courtesy of the artist

Samara Joy performs at the 2022 Newport Jazz Festival, which spanned from July 29 to July 31, in Newport, R.I. Ozier Muhammad for NPR hide caption

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Ozier Muhammad for NPR

A generation of contemporary artists are drawing on the lessons of the past to reimagine the classic bolero. Left to right: Olga Guillot, La Lupe, and Doris Anahí Victor Bizar Gomez for NPR hide caption

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Victor Bizar Gomez for NPR

Renaissance, Beyoncé's seventh full-length solo album, mines a liberating history of dance music, from Donna Summer-sampling disco to modern Chicago house. Carlijn Jacobs/Via Parkwood Entertainment hide caption

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Carlijn Jacobs/Via Parkwood Entertainment

The Heart of Afghanistan project is Ahmad Fanoos on vocals & harmonium, his sons Elham on piano and Mehran on violin, with Hamid Habibzada on tabla. Sachyn Mital/Sachyn Mital hide caption

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Sachyn Mital/Sachyn Mital

Thousands of Afghan artists are still trying to flee the Taliban

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Rhoda Scott Alexandre Lacombe/Alexandre Lacombe hide caption

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Alexandre Lacombe/Alexandre Lacombe

An American in Paris: organist Rhoda Scott's remarkable career in Jazz

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"New Beyoncé is literally good for everybody in the world," Maggie Rogers says of Renaissance, which shares a release date with her own Surrender. "I'm so excited for this record." Olivia Bee/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Olivia Bee/Courtesy of the artist

Missy Elliott Scott Gries/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Gries/Getty Images

Culture Corner: Missy Elliott on World Cafe

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Beyoncé's long-awaited seventh solo album, Act I Renaissance, is due out Friday, July 29. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

The power of Beyoncé is about to change music... again

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Jens Lekman in 2022. Ellika Henrikson/Courtesy of Chromatic PR hide caption

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Ellika Henrikson/Courtesy of Chromatic PR

For Swedish musician Jens Lekman, recrafting old albums was a lesson in self-love

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"We're not friends like we go out and talk about the weather," Emily Sprague says about her bandmates in Florist. "We're friends like we are a part of each other's souls." Carl Solether/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Carl Solether/Courtesy of the artist