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Doug Carn, left, with his wife, Jean Carn, in a detail from the cover of their album Spirit of the New Land, released on Black Jazz Records in 1972. Courtesy of Real Gone Records hide caption

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Courtesy of Real Gone Records

A 1939 portrait of opera singer Lawrence Tibbett, the co-founder and first president of the American Guild of Musical Artists (AGMA). Fairfax Media/Getty Images hide caption

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Fairfax Media/Getty Images

Rabbi Yehonatan Adouar teaches a shofar blowing course in Rambam Synagogue in Ramat Gan, Israel Daniel Estrin/NPR hide caption

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Daniel Estrin/NPR

Wanted in Israel: More Shofar Blowers For Socially Distanced Jewish New Year

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Black Sabbath circa 1970. Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

50 Years Ago, Black Sabbath Found Its Sound And Took Metal Worldwide

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Stanley Crouch, photographed during The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music's Beacon Awards Gala on Feb. 27, 2006 in New York. Patrick McMullan/Patrick McMullan via Getty Image hide caption

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Patrick McMullan/Patrick McMullan via Getty Image

Cosmos Karaoke is a lively karaoke bar in the middle of Namie, a small city that is slowly reopening after the 2011 earthquake, tsunami and nuclear accident devastated the area. Minza Lee (right) is the driving force behind the bar. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

A Karaoke Bar Is Helping A Japanese Town Come Back To Life After Fukushima Disaster

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Megan Thee Stallion performs at the BET Hip Hop Awards in October 2019. Carmen Mandato/Getty Images hide caption

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Carmen Mandato/Getty Images

Making Sense Of Megan Thee Stallion's Shooting, And What Followed

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Amanda Jones, a singer-songwriter turned film and TV composer, is the first African American woman to earn an Emmy nomination for original television score. Ian Spanier/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Ian Spanier/Courtesy of the artist

Keeping Up With Amanda Jones, Score Composer On The Rise

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Ronald "Khalis" Bell, performing with Kool & The Gang on March 29, 1974. ABC Photo Archives/Walt Disney Television via Getty hide caption

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ABC Photo Archives/Walt Disney Television via Getty

Hal Willner in 2011. The producer's final project, created before his death in April, is AngelHeaded Hipster: The Songs of Marc Bolan. Timothy Greenfield-Sanders hide caption

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Timothy Greenfield-Sanders

A Final Bow From Hal Willner, The Producer With The Golden Rolodex

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Electric Lady "was this colorful, vibrant space that encouraged you to use your imagination and and inspired new music," says Lee Foster. It's an atmosphere he continues to cultivate in the studios today. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

50 Years Later, Jimi Hendrix's Electric Lady Studios Is Still An Artistic Haven

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