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NYC Health Department field responder Renée Nicolas prepares a medicine lock box for a methadone delivery in Far Rockaway, Queens, New York last Friday. Olivia Reingold/NPR hide caption

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Olivia Reingold/NPR

An aerial view shows people gathered in painted circles on the grass encouraging social distancing last week at Dolores Park in San Francisco. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

WHO Warns Of A 'Second Peak' In Countries That Reopen Too Quickly

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Every usable video slot machine has a sticker that reminds the user to sanitize the machine prior to using at the WaterView Casino and Hotel in Vicksburg, Miss., on May 21. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

A makeshift memorial, seen Tuesday, has grown near where George Floyd died while in the custody of Minneapolis police. Mourners have brought flowers, signs and balloons to the site in Floyd's memory. Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

A judge in Baker City, Ore., ruled that Gov. Kate Brown had acted beyond her authority by extending the state's stay-at-home restrictions. Kirk Siegler hide caption

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Kirk Siegler

In a survey of parents nationwide from ParentsTogether, parents from low-income homes are ten times more likely to say their kids are doing little or no remote learning. Courtesy of ParentsTogether via SurveyMonkey hide caption

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Courtesy of ParentsTogether via SurveyMonkey
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A Bold Pitch To Boost School Funding For The Nation's Most Vulnerable Students

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The city of Wuhan, where the coronavirus first began to spread, is pictured on May 14. Many Chinese cities have seen rush hour traffic return to pre-pandemic levels — or worse — after reopening, according to traffic data company TomTom. Cities around the world are trying to figure out how to avoid disastrous gridlock as residents resume travel while avoiding public transit. Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images

As Lockdown Orders Lift, Can Cities Prevent A Traffic Catastrophe?

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In Large Texas Cities, Access To Coronavirus Testing May Depend On Where You Live

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Aurélia Durand

For the first time, Twitter has directed users to a fact check of a tweet by President Trump. Denis Charlet/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Denis Charlet/AFP via Getty Images

Twitter Places Fact-Checking Warning On Trump Tweet For 1st Time

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The April 19 edition of The Boston Globe had 16 pages of obituaries. Brian Snyder/Reuters hide caption

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Brian Snyder/Reuters

Obituary Writer Aims To Show How Coronavirus Impacts 'All People In Our Society'

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People enjoy on the beach in Long Branch, New Jersey on May 24, during the Memorial Day weekend holiday. In many parts of the country, states are starting to reopen and relax regulations but Dr. Ashish Jha, Director of Harvard's Global Health Institute, said we will likely see a lot more sickness and deaths in the summer months. Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/AFP via Getty Images

99,000 People Dead And A Dire Summer Prediction

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From left: Comedians Natasha Chandel, Abdullah Afzal and Mariam Sobh. They each performed a set during the Socially Distant Eid Comedy Night Special, a virtual event hosted by the Concordia Forum. Facebook/ Screengrabs by NPR hide caption

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Facebook/ Screengrabs by NPR

Women hold signs while protesting near the area where a Minneapolis Police Department officer allegedly killed George Floyd, on Tuesday in Minneapolis, Minn. A 10-minute video widely circulated on social media shows a police officer using his knee to pin the man's neck to the ground for multiple minutes. Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

Memorial Day weekend at Robert Moses State Park on Fire Island, N.Y. As the pandemic continues, Harvard's Dr. Ashish Jha says, mask wearing, social distancing and robust strategies of testing and contact tracing will be even more important. Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Nearing 100,000 COVID-19 Deaths, U.S. Is Still 'Early In This Outbreak'

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