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Riley Williams, 22, of Harrisburg, Pa., will have to wear an ankle monitor and can only leave her mother's home for work and some other court-approved reasons, as reported by the Patriot-News. Dauphin County Prison via AP hide caption

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Dauphin County Prison via AP

Larry Rendall Brock Jr., an Air Force veteran, is seen inside the Senate Chamber wearing a military-style helmet and tactical vest during the rioting at the U.S. Capitol. Federal prosecutors have alleged that before the attack, Brock posted on Facebook about an impending "Second Civil War." Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Nearly 1 In 5 Defendants In Capitol Riot Cases Served In The Military

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Federal prosecutors are accusing Patrick Edward McCaughey III of using a police shield to pin an officer against a door during the Jan. 6 storming of the Capitol building. Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

Pamela and Afshin Raghebi celebrate a birthday together. Afshin, who was born in Iran, has been stuck overseas, away from his U.S. citizen wife, for more than two years after he flew abroad for an interview at a U.S. Consulate as part of his green card application. Pamela Raghebi hide caption

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Pamela Raghebi

Legacy Of President Trump's Travel Ban Will Be Hard For Biden To Erase

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Avril Haines, President-elect Joe Biden's pick for director of national intelligence, speaks during her confirmation hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday. Melina Mara/AP hide caption

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Melina Mara/AP

Alejandro Mayorkas, nominee to be secretary of homeland security, is sworn in to testify during his confirmation hearing in the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee on Tuesday. Erin Scott/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Erin Scott/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

From Border Wall To Capitol Riot, Homeland Security Nominee Takes Senate Questions

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Alleged members of several different right-wing and extremist groups are facing charges in connection with the Jan. 6 siege at the U.S. Capitol. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat from California, speaks during a news conference at the U.S. Capitol on Friday. Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A temporary 6-foot-high chain-link fence now surrounds California's state Capitol. Gov. Gavin Newsom said Thursday, "Let me be clear: There will be no tolerance for violence." Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

A vast majority of self-identified Republicans do not consider President Trump to blame for the attack on the U.S. Capitol. Graeme Sloan/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Graeme Sloan/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Opinion: The Fringe Of America's Fabric

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The FBI informed the Defense Department of 68 current and former military members who were investigated in domestic extremism probes in 2020, according to a senior defense official. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Steven Sund was chief of U.S. Capitol Police during the Jan. 6 insurrection. He resigned after the attack but defends his agency's preparations. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images

Pro-Trump supporters breeched security and stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Federal authorities as well as several local departments are looking into whether any off-duty officers were involved in the attack. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Civil liberties advocates say they fear that the kinds of measures that could be put in place after last week's riot at the U.S. Capitol could disproportionately hurt minorities. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Response To Capitol Riot Could Hurt Minorities, Civil Libertarians Say

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Enhanced security measures, among them razor wire atop a security fence surrounding the U.S. Capitol, are being implemented across the nation in preparation for next week's presidential inauguration. BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images

Convinced the election was stolen, thousands of Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol building on Jan. 6 as Congress counts and certifies the Electoral College vote. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

FAA administrator Stephen Dickson, seen testifying before a Senate committee last year, has ordered "zero tolerance" of passengers who disrupt airline flights. Graeme Jennings/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Graeme Jennings/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

When law enforcement officials failed to anticipate that pro-Trump supporters would devolve into a violent mob, they fell victim to what one expert calls "the invisible obvious." He said it was hard for authorities to see that people who looked like them could want to commit this kind of violence. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Why Didn't The FBI And DHS Produce A Threat Report Ahead of The Capitol Insurrection?

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