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U.S. Abrams tanks participate in a live fire demonstration during training exercises in Poland in September 2022. President Biden announced Wednesday that the U.S. will be sending 31 Abrams tanks to Ukraine. Germany also said it will be sending tanks. Omar Marques/Getty Images hide caption

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Omar Marques/Getty Images

German Chancellor Olaf Scholz stands next to a Leopard 2 main battle tank of the German armed forces while visiting an army training center in Ostenholz, Germany, on Oct. 17, 2022. David Hecker/Getty Images hide caption

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David Hecker/Getty Images

A man plays violin on the sidelines of a religious service held by local residents in front of an apartment building in the Ukrainian city of Dnipro on Sunday. The building was destroyed by a Russian missile strike on Jan. 14. Anatolii Stepanov/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Anatolii Stepanov/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin (left) and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Mark Milley, discuss details of a huge U.S. and NATO arms package for Ukraine at the U.S. air base in Ramstein, Germany, on Friday. ANDRE PAIN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ANDRE PAIN/AFP via Getty Images

Two Leopard 2 A6 heavy battle tanks and a Puma infantry fighting vehicle of the Bundeswehr's 9th Panzer Training Brigade participate in a demonstration of capabilities during a visit by then-Defense Minister Christine Lambrecht to the Bundeswehr Army training grounds in February 2022 in Munster, Germany. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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By one estimate, some 50 million government documents are classified every year. Tetra Images/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

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Tetra Images/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

How The Government Tracks Classified Documents—And Why It's An Imperfect System

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Is the U.S. government designating too many documents as 'classified'?

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The U.S. government classifies some 50 million documents every year, but doesn't declassify documents at nearly that rate. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

The U.S. has an overclassification problem, says one former special counsel

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In this photo released by the State Emergency Service of Ukraine, firefighters carry a wounded woman out of the rubble of a building after a Russian rocket attack on Saturday in Dnipro. Pavel Petrov/AP hide caption

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Pavel Petrov/AP

FILE - Weapons lie on the ground as Ukrainian personnel train at a base in Southern England. The U.S. military's new, expanded combat training of Ukrainian forces began in Germany on Jan. 15. Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP hide caption

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Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

Ukraine's Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba during a meeting of the NATO Ministers of Foreign Affairs in November. STOYAN NENOV/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STOYAN NENOV/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Where The Ukraine War Goes Next

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Robert Hur speaks in 2018 when he was the U.S. attorney in Maryland. On Thursday he was appointed by Attorney General Merrick Garland as special counsel to investigate whether President Biden improperly handled classified documents. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Proud Boys leader Enrique Tarrio, seen in May 2021, is on trial in Washington, accused of crimes related to the Jan. 6 storming of the Capitol. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice - pictured here at a reception of the American Academy in Berlin - has called for "urgency" in sending weapons and financial aid to Ukraine. Julia Nikhinson/AP hide caption

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Julia Nikhinson/AP

Condoleezza Rice calls for 'urgency' in sending weapons and money to Ukraine

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Extreme weather, fueled by climate change, cost the U.S. $165 billion in 2022

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In this photo made available by Saudi Press Agency, Saudi Crown Prince and Prime Minister Mohammed bin Salman, center, talks with Gulf Arab leaders during the Gulf Cooperation Council Summit in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in December. Gulf Arab leaders and others in the Mideast met as part of a state visit by Chinese leader Xi Jinping. AP hide caption

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AP