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National Security

Afghans crowd at the tarmac of the Kabul airport on August 16, 2021, to flee the country as the Taliban took control of Afghanistan. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

A U.S. Marine's View From Kabul's Airport As the City Fell to the Taliban

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A Federal Bureau of Investigation police officer walks with his working dog outside Federal Bureau of Investigation building headquarters in Washington, Saturday, Aug. 13, 2022. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

The Kabul airport was a chaotic mess in the weeks leading up the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan as Afghans tried to flee the country. Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Wakil Kohsar/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. Democrat Sen. Ed Markey of Massachusetts, left, and Democratic House member John Garamendi of California, second left, back, arrive with their wives at the parliament building in Taipei, on Aug. 15, 2022. Johnson Lai/AP hide caption

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Johnson Lai/AP

American journalist Austin Tice (portrait at left) was abducted in Syria in 2012. Here, his parents, Debra and Marc Tice, give a news conference in Beirut in 2018. Joseph Eid/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Eid/AFP via Getty Images

President Richard Nixon speaks at the White House on Aug. 9, 1974. He was preparing to leave the day after resigning because of the Watergate scandal. Nixon wanted to take his presidential documents with him, including his infamous tape recordings. But he was barred from doing so, and Congress passed a law that now requires all presidents to hand over their documents to the National Archives. Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

FBI agents document evidence outside a bureau field office in Kenwood, Ohio, on Aug. 11, after an armed man tried to breach the building. He fled and was later killed by law enforcement, authorities said. WKEF/WRGT via AP hide caption

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WKEF/WRGT via AP

American pilot Francis Gary Powers (far right) during his 1960 trial in Moscow. Powers was shot down while flying a U-2 spy plane over the Soviet Union. He was jailed for nearly two years before he was freed in a swap for a Soviet spy imprisoned in the U.S. AP hide caption

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AP

The Cold War to Brittney Griner: a new twist in U.S.-Russia prisoner swaps

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New York Gov. Kathy Hochul announced that she is pledging $10 million to establish new teams in every county and in New York City dedicated primarily to combat domestic terrorism. Here, Hochul holds up signed legislation as she is surrounded by lawmakers during a bill signing ceremony at the Northeast Bronx YMCA on June 6, 2022 in New York City. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

The cargo ship Razoni crosses the Bosporus Strait in Istanbul, Turkey, on Aug. 3. The first cargo ship to leave Ukraine since the Russian invasion was anchored at an inspection area in the Black Sea off the coast of Istanbul Wednesday morning before moving on to Lebanon. Khalil Hamra/AP hide caption

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Khalil Hamra/AP

This handout image shows a Marine passing out water to evacuees during an evacuation at Hamid Karzai International Airport, Kabul, Afghanistan, Aug. 22. U.S. Central Command Public Affairs hide caption

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U.S. Central Command Public Affairs

A former Marine details the chaotic exit from Afghanistan — and how we should mark it

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The seashore on southwest Japan's Yonaguni island. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

On Japan's Yonaguni island, fears of being on the front line of a Taiwan conflict

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President Barack Obama delivers a televised statement that Osama bin Laden was killed in 2011. President Donald Trump makes a statement announcing the death of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi in 2019. President Biden announces on Monday that a U.S. drone strike in Afghanistan killed al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahiri. Brendan Smialowski/Pool; Alex Wong; Jim Watson/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/Pool; Alex Wong; Jim Watson/Pool/Getty Images

An April 2018 photo provided by the Chinese government shows the country's first aircraft carrier, the Liaoning (front), steaming with other ships during a drill at sea. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

US National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan. BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images

The National Security Advisor's Very Busy Week

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Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., right, welcomes Paivi Nevala, minister counselor of the Finnish Embassy, left, and Karin Olofsdotter, Sweden's ambassador to the U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

White House National Security Adviser Jake Sullivan. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Biden's national security adviser doubles down on Taiwan policy after Pelosi visit

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President Bill Clinton holds up his hands indicating no more questions as he and Chinese President Jiang Zemin hold a joint press conference in 1997 in Washington, D.C. Clinton confirmed that he agreed to lift a ban on the export of nuclear power technology to China. Joyce Naltchayan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joyce Naltchayan/AFP via Getty Images

What 3 past Taiwan Strait crises can teach us about U.S.-China tensions today

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