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National Security

Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe, seen above during his earlier tenure in the House, delivered a briefing on election threats on Wednesday evening. Gabriella Demczuk/AP hide caption

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Gabriella Demczuk/AP

A poll worker places vote-by mail ballots into a ballot box this month at the Miami-Dade County Election Department headquarters in Doral, Fla. Voters in Florida are among those who have reported receiving emails threatening them to vote for President Trump. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Assistant Attorney General John C. Demers of the Justice Department's National Security Division, pictured on Oct. 7, has announced new charges against Russians allegedly connected to the Russian military intelligence agency GRU. Jim Watson/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

DOJ Unveils More Sweeping Cyber-Charges Against Russian Intelligence Officers

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Former national security adviser John Bolton, pictured in August 2019, says the U.S. is not safer than it was four years ago. Sergei Gapon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sergei Gapon/AFP via Getty Images

John Bolton Says U.S. Is 'Not Safer' Today Than It Was Before Trump Presidency

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FBI Director Christopher Wray testifies before the Senate's Homeland Security Committee on Sept. 24. Wray and other national security officials say they've taken extensive safeguards to protect this year's election. This message is often in sharp contrast with President Trump, who has repeatedly questioned the integrity of the vote. Tom Williams/AP hide caption

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Tom Williams/AP

Normally Invisible, National Security Figures Assume Prominent Election Role

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The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Mark Milley, talked with NPR's Steve Inskeep about the potential for a disputed election. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Mark Milley, pictured on July 9, tells NPR there is "no role for the U.S. military in determining the outcome of a U.S. election. Zero." Greg Nash/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Nash/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Gen. Mark Milley Says The Military Plays 'No Role' In Elections

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Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer addressed the state on Thursday after the Michigan attorney general, Michigan State Police, U.S. Department of Justice, and FBI announced state and federal charges against 13 members of two militia groups who were preparing to kidnap and possibly kill the governor. AP hide caption

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AP

The Michigan Kidnapping Plot And What's Fueling Right-Wing Extremism

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Indian Minister of External Affairs Subrahmanyam Jaishankar (from left), Japanese Foreign Minister Toshimitsu Motegi, Australian Foreign Minister Marise Payne and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo attend a meeting Tuesday in Tokyo. Charly Triballeau/Pool via AP hide caption

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Charly Triballeau/Pool via AP

Army Gen. Mark Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, is among several top military officials who are quarantining at home. They attended meetings last week with Adm. Charles Ray, the vice commandant of the Coast Guard, who has tested positive for COVID-19. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Former CIA chief John Brennan has a new book out titled Undaunted. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Former Spy Chief Brennan Looks Back At Sept. 11 — And Ahead To Presidential Election

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Former CIA Director John Brennan testifies on Capitol Hill in May 2017 before the House Intelligence Committee Russia Investigation Task Force. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

A U.S. flag flies above a fence at the detention facility at the U.S. Naval Station at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, on Dec. 10, 2008, in an image reviewed by the U.S. military. Mandel Ngan-Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan-Pool/Getty Images

A contentious scenario could play out if President Trump disagrees with assessments of his ability to perform in office, says John Fortier, former executive director of the Continuity of Government Commission. Trump is seen here preparing to leave the White House earlier this week for a fundraising event and campaign rally in Minnesota. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

'Contentious' Scenarios Arise For Ballot And Presidency If Trump's Health Declines

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"This is a moment for the Afghan leaders not to repeat the mistakes of the past, to build a consensus-based system where all key players can participate, and perhaps peace in Afghanistan can change the dynamics even regionally," says U.S. Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation Zalmay Khalilzad, shown here in March. Rahmat Gul/AP hide caption

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Rahmat Gul/AP

Khalilzad: 'A Moment For The Afghan Leaders Not To Repeat The Mistakes Of The Past'

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