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National Security

The FBI informed the Defense Department of 68 current and former military members who were investigated in domestic extremism probes in 2020, according to a senior defense official. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Steven Sund was chief of U.S. Capitol Police during the Jan. 6 insurrection. He resigned after the attack but defends his agency's preparations. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images

Pro-Trump supporters breeched security and stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Federal authorities as well as several local departments are looking into whether any off-duty officers were involved in the attack. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Civil liberties advocates say they fear that the kinds of measures that could be put in place after last week's riot at the U.S. Capitol could disproportionately hurt minorities. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Enhanced security measures, among them razor wire atop a security fence surrounding the U.S. Capitol, are being implemented across the nation in preparation for next week's presidential inauguration. BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images

Convinced the election was stolen, thousands of Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol building on Jan. 6 as Congress counts and certifies the Electoral College vote. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

FAA administrator Stephen Dickson, seen testifying before a Senate committee last year, has ordered "zero tolerance" of passengers who disrupt airline flights. Graeme Jennings/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Graeme Jennings/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

When law enforcement officials failed to anticipate that pro-Trump supporters would devolve into a violent mob, they fell victim to what one expert calls "the invisible obvious." He said it was hard for authorities to see that people who looked like them could want to commit this kind of violence. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Why Didn't The FBI And DHS Produce A Threat Report Ahead of The Capitol Insurrection?

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Pro-Trump extremists climb the walls of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. The pro-Trump mob broke windows of the Capitol and clashed with police officers. Now there's debate about whether federal charges of seditious conspiracy should be used against some of the rioters. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Federal 'Strike Force' Builds Sedition Cases Against Capitol Rioters. Will It Work?

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A number of GOP members — including the No. 3 House Republican — have already said they will vote for impeachment. A Democrat from a Trump-voting district sees several more Republicans joining the vote to impeach. Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

Up To 12 House Republicans May Vote For Trump Impeachment, Democratic Lawmaker Says

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Fox Business host Lou Dobbs suggested Republicans who voted to certify President-elect Joe Biden's win were "criminal." John Lamparski/Getty Images hide caption

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John Lamparski/Getty Images

After Deadly Capitol Riot, Fox News Stays Silent On Stars' Incendiary Rhetoric

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Top Defense Department officials have issued a message to the troops that they must defend the Constitution and that last week's violence at the U.S. Capitol was a direct assault on it. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call Inc. via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call Inc. via Getty Images

Former FBI Director James Comey, here in 2017, says he was "sickened" by last week's attack on the Capitol. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

James Comey: Trump Should Be Impeached But Not Federally Prosecuted

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Trump supporters attend an October rally hosted by Long Island and New York City police unions in support of the police in Suffolk County, N.Y. Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden's swearing in is set to continue as scheduled with several security modifications in place. Public access to the U.S. Capitol and to the Washington Monument is so far banned until after Inauguration Day. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Members of the Capitol Police are under investigation for their actions as rioters attacked the U.S. Capitol building on Wednesday. An unspecified number of officers have been suspended. Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

Researchers have used crowdsourcing to scrutinize video and photos from the riot at the Capitol on Jan. 6 and have identified some of those who took part. The researchers have shared their information with law enforcement. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

The acting U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia, Michael Sherwin (left), is overseeing the massive criminal investigation of Wednesday's assault on the U.S. Capitol. Tasos Katopodis/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

D.C.'s Acting U.S. Attorney Calls Scope Of Capitol Investigation 'Unprecedented'

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At a bus stop on Pennsylvania Avenue Northwest in Washington, D.C., a notice from the FBI seeks information about people pictured during the riot at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Al Drago/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Getty Images