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In a letter to the White House, 24 senators said the U.S. military prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba "has damaged America's reputation, fueled anti-Muslim bigotry, and weakened the United States' ability to counter terrorism and fight for human rights and the rule of law around the world." Maren Hennemuth/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Maren Hennemuth/picture alliance via Getty Images

Senators Urge Biden To Shut Down Guantánamo, Calling It A 'Symbol Of Lawlessness'

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An NPR investigation into the SolarWinds attack reveals a hack unlike any other, launched by a sophisticated adversary intent on exploiting the soft underbelly of our digital lives. Zoë van Dijk for NPR hide caption

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Zoë van Dijk for NPR

A 'Worst Nightmare' Cyberattack: The Untold Story Of The SolarWinds Hack

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U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin, center, walks on the red carpet with Afghan officials as they review an honor guard at the presidential palace in Kabul, Afghanistan, on March 21. President Biden said the U.S. will withdraw all remaining troops from the country by Sept. 11, ending the U.S. involvement in the America's longest-ever war. AP hide caption

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AP

President Biden walks through Arlington National Cemetery to honor fallen veterans of the Afghan conflict in Arlington, Va., on Wednesday. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

'I Wish There Was An Easy Ending:' Afghanistan's Murky Future After Longest U.S. War

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U.S. Marines conduct an operation to clear a village of Taliban fighters on July 5, 2009, in Mian Poshteh, Afghanistan. The U.S. and NATO forces plan to withdraw their remaining troops from Afghanistan by September. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a meeting Wednesday via video link. The sanctions against Moscow signal that "we are going to be clear to Russia that there will be consequences when warranted," the White House press secretary says. Alexei Druzhinin/Sputnik/Kremlin/Pool via AP hide caption

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Alexei Druzhinin/Sputnik/Kremlin/Pool via AP

U.S. Slaps New Sanctions On Russia Over Cyberattack, Election Meddling

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Abdullah Abdullah (center), chairman of the High Council for National Reconciliation, accompanies U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken at the Sapidar Palace in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Thursday. Sapidar Palace via AP hide caption

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Sapidar Palace via AP

Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Karen Gibson attends the service for slain U.S. Capitol Officer William "Billy" Evans, as his remains lie in honor in the Capitol Rotunda on Tuesday. Tom Williams/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

New Senate Sergeant-At-Arms Wants To Keep Capitol Secure And Open To The Public

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A Capitol police officer looks out of a broken window as pro-Trump rioters storm into the building on Jan. 6. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Capitol Police Needs Help To Address Insurrection Failures, Inspector General Says

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President Biden unveils a $2 trillion infrastructure plan in Pittsburgh on March 31. In his speech, Biden said the plan would help the U.S. compete with China. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

For Biden, China Rivalry Adds Urgency To Infrastructure Push

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The FBI has released a substantial amount of information, including surveillance video, about the unidentified bomb-maker. FBI/screenshot by NPR hide caption

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FBI/screenshot by NPR

What We Know About The Suspect Who Planted Bombs Before The Capitol Riot

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A detailed review of the Jan. 6 insurrection by the U.S. Capitol Police's inspector general is set for discussion at a House hearing on Thursday. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Marine Gen. Frank McKenzie (center) visits Kabul, Afghanistan, in January 2020. The Biden administration said it plans to complete a drawdown of U.S. troops in the country by Sept. 11. Lolita Baldor/AP hide caption

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Lolita Baldor/AP

Avril Haines, the director of national intelligence, oversaw the report on leading threats to the U.S., which cites four countries — China, Russia, Iran and North Korea. Haines is set to testify about the report to Congress on Wednesday and Thursday. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Biden's National Security Team Lists Leading Threats, With China At The Top

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Christine Wormuth, pictured testifying on Capitol Hill in March 2015 during her tenure as defense undersecretary for policy, is President Biden's pick for secretary of the Army. Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images hide caption

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Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images

Stewart Rhodes, founder of Oath Keepers, is pictured in Forth Worth, Texas, on Feb. 28. A number of Oath Keepers members or associates are under investigation for the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. Aaron C. Davis/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron C. Davis/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Who Are The Oath Keepers? Militia Group, Founder Scrutinized In Capitol Riot Probe

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U.S. Capitol Police officers and members of the National Guard keep watch at the Constitution Avenue entrance to the East Plaza of the Capitol where an officer was killed when a man rammed a car into the barricade on April 2. The debate about whether there should be permanent fencing will be front and center when lawmakers return next week. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Recent Attacks On The Capitol Have Reignited Debate Over Security And Fencing

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Pro-Trump rioters, including members of the far-right extremist group the Proud Boys, gather near the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. At least 25 people charged in the attack appear to have links to the Proud Boys, according to court documents. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

Conspiracy Charges Bring Proud Boys' History Of Violence Into Spotlight

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Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin visits National Guard troops deployed at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 29. The troops were deployed in the wake of the Jan. 6 Capitol attack. Under Austin's order, all military units are holding "stand downs" to discuss extremism in the ranks. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

The Military Confronts Extremism, One Conversation At A Time

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Army Gen. Paul Nakasone, director of the National Security Agency, says the U.S. has a "blind spot" when it comes to foreign intelligence services that effectively carry out cyberspying from inside the U.S. Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times via AP hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times via AP

After A Major Hack, U.S. Looks To Fix A Cyber 'Blind Spot'

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A staff person removes the Iranian flag from the stage after a group picture with representatives of the United States, Iran, China, Russia, Britain, Germany, France and the European Union during the Iran nuclear talks in July 2015 in Vienna. Carlos Barria/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Carlos Barria/Pool/AFP via Getty Images