National Security National Security

National Security

FBI's Renewed Inquiry Into Clinton Email Case Comes 11 Days Before Election Day

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/499867657/499867658" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

FBI Investigates New Emails Related To Clinton Private Server Case

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/499867650/499867651" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In order to reduce shootings, all Border Patrol agents are now required to train in a simulated environment complete with immigrants threatening rocks. Agent Aaron Sims trains on the simulator at the CBP National Training Center in Harper's Ferry, W.V. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
John Burnett/NPR

Combating Corruption: U.S. Customs And Border Protection Seeks Deep Reform

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/499739689/499867768" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

FBI Reopens Probe Into Hillary Clinton's Email Server

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/499796098/499796099" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Ambassador to China Max Baucus, a former Montana senator, recently became the first American envoy to China to visit all of the country's provinces. "We Americans have an obligation to come to China, to learn more about China," he tells NPR. "Why? Because with each passing day, it's going to be more and more in our future." Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Anthony Kuhn/NPR

U.S. Envoy: China Will Be 'More And More In Our Future'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/499637456/499637457" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter, pictured at a June news conference, said the Pentagon ultimately "will provide for a process that puts as little burden as possible on any soldier who received an improper payment through no fault of his or her own." Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Brandon/AP

A man watches a TV news program showing a file image of missile launch conducted by North Korea, at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, on Oct. 20. The U.S. military said it detected a failed North Korean missile launch that day. The U.S. Strategic Command issued a statement late Wednesday saying it presumed the missile was a Musudan intermediate-range ballistic missile. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Lee Jin-man/AP

Even With Failures, North Korea's Nuclear Program Races Ahead

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/499321245/499343647" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A New York Police Department security camera set up along a street in New York City on Aug. 26. Robert Alexander/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Robert Alexander/Getty Images

It Ain't Me, Babe: Researchers Find Flaws In Police Facial Recognition Technology

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/499176469/499262869" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thousands Of California Soldiers Forced To Repay Enlistment Bonuses

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/499199320/499199321" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Police Facial Recognition Databases Log About Half Of Americans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/499042369/499042370" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Iraqi forces raise a flag after retaking Bartella, a town nine miles outside Mosul, Iraq, on Friday. Iraq's army, backed by U.S. air power, began an offensive this week to retake Mosul, the last city in Iraq controlled by the Islamic State. Some smaller towns and villages were retaken this week, but the Iraqis have not yet reached Mosul. Khalid Mohammed/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Khalid Mohammed/AP

WikiLeaks Dump Method: Sociologist Says Not All Leaked Passes Public Interest Test

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/498954190/498954191" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The house of Harold Thomas Martin III, a federal government contractor who is accused of stealing classified information, in Glen Burnie, Md. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jose Luis Magana/AP