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Representatives of Facebook, Google and Twitter are testifying on Capitol Hill on Tuesday about Russia's use of their platforms. Liam James Doyle/NPR hide caption

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Liam James Doyle/NPR

Bharara: Papadopoulos Plea 'Portends More Charges To Come'

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Special counsel Robert Mueller (left) arrives at the U.S. Capitol for closed meeting with members of the Senate Judiciary Committee on June 21 in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

After A Day Of Legal Shock And Awe, What's Next For The Mueller Investigation?

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George Papadopoulos, left, pleaded guilty earlier this month to lying to FBI agents about a series of meetings he took and planned while he was a foreign policy adviser to the Trump campaign. Costas Bej/Courtesy of The National Herald hide caption

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Costas Bej/Courtesy of The National Herald

Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort (right), leaves U.S. District Court after pleading not guilty to federal charges, including "conspiracy against the United States," on Monday in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

2016 Under Scrutiny: A Timeline Of Russia Connections

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Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, with Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis, testifies during a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on Congress's power to authorize the use of military force. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., and Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., talk about their introduction of a new Authorization for the Use of Military Force against ISIS, al-Qaida and the Taliban during a news conference at the U.S. Capitol on May 25, 2017. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A Look At The Presence Of ISIS And Its Affiliated Groups In Africa

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Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is escorted into the Ft. Bragg military courthouse for his sentencing hearing on Monday in Ft. Bragg, N.C. Sara D. Davis/Getty Images hide caption

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Sara D. Davis/Getty Images

Manafort, Gates Indicted By Mueller Special Investigation

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Paul Manafort makes his way through television cameras as he walks from federal court in Washington, D.C., on Monday. President Trump's former campaign manager pleaded not guilty to charges in an indictment stemming from a special counsel's probe into the 2016 race and Russia's attempted interference in the election. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

The Future Of The President's Authorization For Use Of Military Force

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., left, President Trump, center, and House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., will have their relationships tested by the a legislative push on a tax overhaul this week. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Civil rights leader Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and his wife Coretta Scott King lead a black voting rights march from Selma, Ala., to the state capital in Montgomery in 1965. William Lovelace/Getty Images hide caption

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William Lovelace/Getty Images

The AUMF: An Everlasting 'Zombie Authorization'

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