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National Security

Carryn Owens, the widow of Navy SEAL William "Ryan" Owens, fought back tears as President Trump addressed her during his speech to a joint session of Congress Tuesday. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Then-Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump waves to the crowd after speaking at the National Rifle Association convention in May 2016. The NRA supports the repeal of the Obama-era rule. Mark Humphrey/AP hide caption

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Mark Humphrey/AP

Former Sen. Dan Coats, R-Ind., has been nominated by President Trump to be the next director of national intelligence and oversee the U.S. intelligence community. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Senate Considers Trump's Choice For National Intelligence Director

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A shipyard worker walks to his car at the end of the workday at Bath Iron Works in Bath, Maine. With President Trump demanding more ships, the Navy is proposing the biggest shipbuilding boom since the end of the Cold War to meet potential threats from Russia and China. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

President Donald Trump signs a bill repealing a rule passed last July that required oil, gas and mining companies to disclose payments to overseas governments. The rule was meant to promote transparency. Critics of the repeal argue it served as an important national security tool since corruption often leads to violence, instability and terrorism. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Repeal Of Anti-Corruption Rule May Hurt National Security, Critics Warn

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Pentagon Officials Review Overall Strategy To Fight ISIS

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President Trump's deputy assistant Sebastian Gorka participates in a discussion during the Conservative Political Action Conference on Friday. Gorka has been the subject of criticism by others in the counterterrorism field. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents in February in Los Angeles. The mayor of the city has asked ICE agents not to identify themselves as police during operations. Bryan Cox/AP hide caption

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Bryan Cox/AP

In late 2015, the Obama administration began checking the social media accounts of Syrian refugees seeking to come to the U.S. The practice has continued and may be expanded under the Trump administration. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Trump Administration Weighs Increased Scrutiny Of Refugees' Social Media

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Trump Adviser Sebastian Gorka Threatens Legal Action Over Tweets

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