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Eric Parker of the Real 3%ers Idaho attends a convoy training exercise in western Idaho on Jan. 25. NPR has followed Parker's political evolution as he joins a wave of "patriot movement" figures seeking – and sometimes winning – public office. Jim Urquhart for NPR hide caption

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Jim Urquhart for NPR

Militia Leader Known As The 'Bundy Ranch Sniper' Seeks A New Title: State Senator

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Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, who was captured on cellphone video kneeling on Floyd's neck for several minutes, still faces a higher charge of second-degree murder. Brommerich/AP hide caption

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Brommerich/AP

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Oct. 14. On Thursday, the committee voted to advance her nomination to the full Senate for a confirmation vote. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AP hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AP

President Trump and U.S. Attorney General William Barr leave after delivering remarks on the 2020 census in the White House Rose Garden in 2019 in Washington, D.C. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Jeffrey Epstein and Ghislaine Maxwell, shown here in 2005, allegedly ran a sex-trafficking operation together. in a 2016 deposition, Maxwell repeatedly denied "recruiting" girls for Epstein or taking part in orgies and other activities. Patrick McMullan via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick McMullan via Getty Images

The Justice Department says Google CEO Sundar Pichai (left) met privately with Apple chief Tim Cook in 2018 to discuss how their two companies could collaborate. Bertrand Guay/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bertrand Guay/AFP via Getty Images

Researchers say 70% of nursing homes are for-profit, and low staffing is common. Jackyenjoyphotography/Getty Images hide caption

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Jackyenjoyphotography/Getty Images

For-Profit Nursing Homes' Pleas For Government Money Brings Scrutiny

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When Angela Settles' husband, Darius, got sick with COVID-19, he was worried about medical bills. He worked two jobs but had no health insurance. Blake Farmer/WPLN News hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN News

An election worker uses an electronic pollbook to check voters at a polling station in the Echo Park Recreation Complex in Los Angeles on March 3, 2020. Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Rural communities across the country, places largely spared during the early days of the pandemic, are now seeing spikes in infections and hospitalizations. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

COVID-19 Surges In Rural Communities, Overwhelming Some Local Hospitals

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Wind turbines near Dwight, Ill. and a pump jack in Cotulla, Texas. The presidential candidates have opposing views on the future of U.S. energy. Scott Olson and Loren Elliott/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson and Loren Elliott/AFP/Getty Images

Far-right extremist "Boogaloo boys" stand on the steps of the capitol in Lansing, Mich., during a rally on Oct. 17. Michigan is one of five states with the highest risk of increased militia activity around the elections, according to a new report. Seth Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Seth Herald/Getty Images

Here's Where The Threat Of Militia Activity Around The Elections Is The Highest

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Jets fly over the Presidential Office during Taiwan's National Day in Taipei on Oct. 10. Sam Yeh/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Yeh/AFP via Getty Images

How Trump Is Winning Hearts And Minds In Taiwan — Risking China's Wrath

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Pueblo Mayor Nick Gradisar attended the Legislative BBQ at Colorado State Fair on August 23, 2019 in Pueblo, Colorado. RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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RJ Sangosti/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post via Getty Images

Colorado Mayor Dealing With Rise In COVID-19: 'This Is Going To Be A Lost Year'

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Emergency medical technician Breonna Taylor, 26, was shot and killed by police in her home in March. Her name has become a rallying cry in protests against police brutality and social injustice. Taylor Family hide caption

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Taylor Family

Purdue Pharma headquarters in Stamford, Conn., in 2019. Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, and its owners, the Sackler family, have faced hundreds of lawsuits over the company's alleged role in the opioid epidemic that has killed more than 200,000 Americans. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Purdue Pharma Reaches $8B Opioid Deal With Justice Department Over OxyContin Sales

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The University of Michigan football stadium is shown in Ann Arbor, Mich., this summer. Health officials in Michigan say infections among university students account for over 60% of local infections. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP