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Officer Joe Gutierrez aims his weapon at Lt. Caron Navario during a traffic stop. Navario is suing Gutierrez and the other officer, Daniel Crocker, for violation of his constitutional rights. NPR screenshot/Windsor Police Department body camera footage hide caption

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NPR screenshot/Windsor Police Department body camera footage

Mayor-elect Tishaura Jones says race will no longer be an afterthought under her incoming administration. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Long Marred By Racism, St. Louis Elects 1st Black Female Mayor

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A driver uses a fast-charging station for electric vehicles at John F. Kennedy airport on April 2. As part of President Biden's $2 trillion infrastructure plan, $174 billion would go to supporting the production of electric vehicles in the U.S. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Amy Sherald, Breonna Taylor, 2020, oil on linen Joseph Hyde/© Amy Sherald. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth hide caption

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Joseph Hyde/© Amy Sherald. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth

'Filled With Her Spirit,' A Louisville Art Exhibition Honors Breonna Taylor

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Dr. Hassan Bencheqroun, an interventional pulmonary and critical care physician, has seen firsthand the impact of COVID-19 on Arab communities in the San Diego area. Hassan Bencheqroun hide caption

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Hassan Bencheqroun

A comprehensive package of police reform measures cleared the Maryland General Assembly on Wednesday, including repeal of police job protections long cited as a barricade to accountability. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

Visitors leave the Wonder Wheel ride after the re-opening of Coney Island's amusement parks on Friday. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

In Coney Island, The Wonder Wheel Spins Again

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Colorado state Rep. Tom Sullivan, pictured here in 2019 introducing former Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg, says now is not the time to push for a statewide ban on assault-style weapons. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

Colorado Assault-Style Weapons Ban Doesn't Look Likely

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President Biden looks on after speaking during an event about gun violence prevention in the Rose Garden of the White House on April 8. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Heinz, the country's largest ketchup supplier, promised to up ketchup production by 25% to make up for the shortage. Smith Collection/Gado/Gado via Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Gado via Getty Images

Heinz Promises To Catch Up To Americans' Demand Amid Ketchup Packet Shortage

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Four alleged members of the "boogaloo boys," an extremist group often identified by their militia gear and hawaiian print, have been indicted for destroying evidence tied to two Bay area police killings. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Apologies — and even opposition from Republican governors — are not enough to stop the wave of anti-trans bills passing through state legislatures around the country. Outside the Alabama State House, demonstrators gathered to draw attention to anti-transgender legislation introduced at the end of March. Julie Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Julie Bennett/Getty Images

New crowdfunding efforts are helping to pay for trips from taxis and ride-hailing apps for Asian American Pacific Islander community members who don't feel safe walking in cities such as New York and San Francisco. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear signs a bill on Friday limiting the use of no-knock warrants statewide. The governor was surrounded by members of Breonna Taylor's family including her mother, Tamika Palmer (standing behind Beshear at left). Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

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Timothy D. Easley/AP

Boeing said Friday that some of its 737 Max planes may have an electrical problem, leading airlines to ground dozens of the jets. An American Airlines flight on a Boeing 737 Max is seen here in December in Miami. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Workers at Amazon's facility in Bessemer, Ala., held a historic vote on whether to form the company's first warehouse union. Bill Barrow/AP hide caption

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Bill Barrow/AP

It's A No: Amazon Warehouse Workers Vote Against Unionizing In Historic Election

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Dr. Andrew Baker, the Hennepin County medical examiner, testifies Friday on the cause and manner of George Floyd's death. Court TV/Pool via AP hide caption

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Court TV/Pool via AP

Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger won wide praise for firmly rejecting former President Donald Trump's false claims of voter fraud. But now that those claims have spawned tighter voting measures, the Republican state official is taking a softer approach. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

Georgia Secretary Of State Says New Voting Law 'Restores Confidence'

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