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BUMP STOCKS BAN

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Books sit on a shelf at a clinic that provides abortion care on April 30, in Jacksonville, Fla. A six-week abortion ban that Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis signed went into effect on May 1. Joe Raedle/Getty Images North America hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images North America

Abortion bans that grant exceptions to 'save the life of the mother' are a gray area

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A photo shows Mooney Falls on the Havasupai reservation in Arizona in May. Dozens of tourists say they fell ill on a recent visit to a popular and picturesque stretch of waterfalls deep in a gorge neighboring Grand Canyon National Park. Randy Shannon/via AP hide caption

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Randy Shannon/via AP

WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 26: Demonstrators participate in a abortion-rights rally outside the Supreme Court as the justices of the court hear oral arguments in the case of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration v. Alliance for Hippocratic Medicine on March 26, 2024 in Washington, DC. The case challenges the 20-plus-year legal authorization by the FDA of mifepristone, a commonly used abortion medication. (Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Infowars founder Alex Jones speaks to the media outside Waterbury Superior Court during his 2022 defamation trial in Waterbury, Conn. Joe Buglewicz/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Buglewicz/Getty Images

ALEX JONES BANKRUPTCY OUTCOME

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From left: Caitlin Clark, Joey Chestnut and Donald Trump Brian Fluharty/Getty Images; Alexi J. Rosenfeld/Getty Images; Chris Graythen/Getty Images hide caption

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Brian Fluharty/Getty Images; Alexi J. Rosenfeld/Getty Images; Chris Graythen/Getty Images

Darrell Kriplean, president of the Phoenix Law Enforcement Association, which represents about 2,200 Phoenix officers, stands at a lectern with microphones to take a question during a news conference Thursday in Phoenix. A Justice Department report said Phoenix police discriminate against Black, Hispanic and Native American people, unlawfully detain homeless people and use excessive force, including unjustified deadly force. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

Demonstrators hold an abortion-rights rally outside the Supreme Court on March 26 as the justices of the court heard oral arguments in Food and Drug Administration v. Alliance for Hippocratic Medicine. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

PROVIDERS RESPOND TO MIFEPRISTONE RULING

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A Southwest Boeing 737 Max 8 jet prepares to land at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport in March, 2019. A similar jet experienced a rare but potentially dangerous event known as a Dutch roll last month. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The Supreme Court ruled against a liberal activist who tried to trademark the phrase "Trump too small," which he put on T-shirts and sold. Luke Hales/Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Hales/Getty Images

The abortion drug Mifepristone, which was approved by the FDA, is part of a two-drug regimen to induce an abortion in the first trimester of pregnancy. The Supreme Court's decision will keep the drug on sale for now. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images North America hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images North America

Supreme Court rejects challenge to FDA's approval of mifepristone

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An aerial view of banana plantations in Apartado, Colombia, taken on June 11. Banana giant Chiquita Brands International says it will appeal a federal jury's decision finding it liable for financing a Colombian paramilitary group known for rampant killings. Danilo Gomez/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Danilo Gomez/AFP via Getty Images

David Lynch on Wild Card Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty hide caption

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Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty

On college campuses, women are making inroads in male-dominated fields like engineering and business. But that is not eliminating the earnings gaps in leadership and income in the workplace. Ania Siniuk for NPR hide caption

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Ania Siniuk for NPR

Victor Corone, 66, pushes his wife Maria Diaz, 64, in a wheelchair through more than a foot of floodwater in Miami Beach, Fla., on Wednesday, June 12, 2024. The annual rainy season has arrived with a wallop in much of Florida. Al Diaz/Miami Herald/AP hide caption

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Al Diaz/Miami Herald/AP

Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito was secretly recorded along with his wife, Martha-Ann Alito, at the annual Supreme Court Historical Society dinner. Erin Schaff/AP hide caption

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Erin Schaff/AP

A filmmaker secretly records Supreme Court Chief Justice Roberts and Justice Alito

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Joey Chestnut emerges victorious after eating 63 hot dogs in 10 minutes during the 2022 Nathans Famous Fourth of July International Hot Dog Eating Contest in New York City. Kena Betancur/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/Getty Images

Nathan's hot-dog eating contest bans Joey Chestnut over Impossible deal

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