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Transportation Security Administration agents help passengers through a security checkpoint at Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, N.J., on Monday. Agents have been working without pay since the shutdown began. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, approved adding a question about U.S. citizenship status to the 2020 census. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Judge Orders Trump Administration To Remove 2020 Census Citizenship Question

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In August 2018, law enforcement officials set up a perimeter around the platform that "Silent Sam," a statue erected to honor Confederate dead, was toppled from. Logan Cyrus/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Logan Cyrus/AFP/Getty Images

American actress and singer Carol Channing starred in the musical "Hello Dolly!" in New York City in 1964. She died at 97. Archive Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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Archive Photos/Getty Images

Bidding Farewell To 'Hello, Dolly!': Actress Carol Channing Dies At 97

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Firemen stand in thick molasses after the disaster in 1919. The Great Molasses Flood in Boston's North End killed 21 people and injured 150. Courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection hide caption

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Courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection

A Deadly Tsunami Of Molasses In Boston's North End

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A migrant worker in a Connecticut apple orchard gets a medical checkup in 2017. A proposed rule by the Trump administration that would prohibit some immigrants who get Medicaid from working legally has already led to a lot of fear and reluctance to sign up for medical care, doctors say. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Rick Romley, former Maricopa County Attorney, held a news conference on Monday, explaining his role in the internal investigation of management and security practices at Arizona's Hacienda Healthcare. Jacques Billeaud/AP hide caption

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Jacques Billeaud/AP

Unauthorized immigrants leave a court in shackles in McAllen, Texas. More than 40,000 immigration court hearings have been canceled since the government shut down. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

The US Capitol in Washington, DC, January 14, 2019, is seen following a snowstorm. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

'Barely Treading Water': Why The Shutdown Disproportionately Affects Black Americans

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Federal regulators have announced plans to allow drone operators to fly their unmanned aerial vehicles over populated areas and at night. A Wing Hummingbird drone from Project Wing arrives and sets down its package at a delivery location in Blacksburg, Va., last year. Michael Shroyer via AP hide caption

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Michael Shroyer via AP

Jake Thomas Patterson is suspected of kidnapping Jayme Closs, 13, and fatally shooting her parents in Barron County, Wis. Barron County Sheriff's Department /AP hide caption

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Barron County Sheriff's Department /AP

After the Camp Fire in November, thousands of people whose homes were destroyed were forced to seek refuge in nearby Chico, Calif. Some 700 people, some in their RVs, are still living at a Red Cross shelter at the Chico fairgrounds. The shelter is expected to close at the end of January. Kirk Siegler/NPR hide caption

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Kirk Siegler/NPR

In The Aftermath Of The Camp Fire, A Slow, Simmering Crisis In Nearby Chico

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