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U.S. federal agencies sent an alert Wednesday night that there is "credible information of an increased and imminent cybercrime threat" to hospitals and healthcare providers. Nicolas Asfouri/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolas Asfouri/AFP via Getty Images

Boeing will be laying off thousands of additional employees as the airplane manufacturer continues to lose money due to the coronavirus pandemic. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Protesters confront police during a march Tuesday in Philadelphia following this week's fatal police shooting of Walter Wallace Jr., a 27-year-old Black man. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

Former Department of Homeland Security chief of staff Miles Taylor, pictured in March 2018, announced he is behind the scathing anti-Trump op-ed and book published under the pen name "Anonymous." Tim Godbee/Department of Homeland Security via AP hide caption

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Tim Godbee/Department of Homeland Security via AP

C'Artis Harris, walking with her children in 2017, was searching for housing that would accept her Section 8 voucher when NPR began following her in 2016. Today, Harris and her family still live in an area of high poverty. Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR hide caption

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Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR

Trump Stokes Fear In The Suburbs, But Few Low-Income Families Ever Make It There

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Illinois Gov. JB Pritzker answers questions from the media, along with Dr. Ngozi Ezike, director of the Illinois Department of Public Health, during his daily press briefing on the COVID-19 pandemic on May 22, in Springfield, Ill. Justin L. Fowler/AP hide caption

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Justin L. Fowler/AP

A voter is shown inserting her absentee voter ballot into a drop box earlier this month in Troy, Mich. A Michigan judge has blocked a ban on openly carrying guns in polling places on Election Day. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

Supporters of President Trump wave during a Latinos for Trump roundtable last month at the Arizona Grand Resort in Phoenix. Nick Oza/The Arizona Republic/USA Today Network via Reuters hide caption

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Nick Oza/The Arizona Republic/USA Today Network via Reuters

Many Latino Men Are Supporting President Trump This Election

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Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, Google CEO Sundar Pichai, and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will testify on Wednesday before the Senate Commerce Committee about a legal shield known as Section 230. Jose Luis Magana, LM Otero, Jens Meyer/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana, LM Otero, Jens Meyer/AP

Facebook, Twitter, Google CEOs Testify To Senate: What To Watch For

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A coal train stops near the White Bluff Plant near Redfield, Ark. in 2014. Entergy Arkansas agreed to eventually stop using coal at this and another plant under a settlement with environmental groups, but a dark money nonprofit funded by Wyoming is pushing to keep them operating. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

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Danny Johnston/AP

A menacing scarecrow approaches the driver's side as what looks like bloody bubbles slide down the window at a haunted car wash in Birmingham, Ala. Melanie Peeples/NPR hide caption

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Melanie Peeples/NPR

2020 Not Scary Enough? Try A Haunted Car Wash

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Police stand guard outside of a rally with Vice President Pence on Oct. 13 in Waukesha, Wis. The state is experiencing a surge of COVID-19 cases, threatening to overwhelm rural hospitals. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Keith Raniere was sentenced to 120 years in prison for his role as ringleader of the NXIVM cult, where he sexually abused several young women. In this June 2019 courtroom artist's sketch, Raniere (center) sits with his attorneys during closing arguments in federal court in New York City. Elizabeth Williams/Via AP hide caption

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Elizabeth Williams/Via AP

An employee takes a pile of chairs inside a closing bar on the Place du Capitole in Toulouse, France on Saturday. Coronavirus cases in the country just topped a million, and there's a new government-imposed curfew. In large parts of the France you can't be out after 9 p.m. Fred Scheiber/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Scheiber/AFP via Getty Images

Coronavirus Cases Are Surging Past The Summer Peak — And Not Just In The U.S.

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