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A sign at the Miami International Airport shows cancelled flights after American Airlines initially grounded its Boeing 737 Max planes in March. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Airlines Cancel Boeing Max Flights Into November; Holiday Flights Could Be Next

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Huge crowds turn up each week to watch a game of baseball on a woodchip field, where the players wear snowshoes. Mackenzie Martin/WXPR hide caption

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Mackenzie Martin/WXPR

Crowds Gather Each Week In Wisconsin To Watch Their Teams Play Ball — In Snowshoes

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James Fields Jr. killed a woman after he drove a car into a group of protesters in Charlottesville, Va., in 2017. On Monday, a judge in Virginia sentenced him to life in prison. Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail via Getty Images hide caption

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Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail via Getty Images

A migrant family waits in Tijuana, Mexico, before being transported to the San Ysidro port of entry to begin the process of applying for asylum in the United States. A new Trump administration rule says immigrants who pass through a third country en route to the U.S. cannot apply for asylum at the U.S. southern border. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Trump Administration Implementing '3rd Country' Rule On Migrants Seeking Asylum

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In March 2019, Attorney Alan Dershowitz speaks with reporters outside of Manhattan Federal Court after Virginia Giuffre filed a defamation lawsuit that includes allegations against him. Frank Franklin II/AP hide caption

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Frank Franklin II/AP

Alan Dershowitz Denies Epstein Rape Accusations And Defends Role In Sweetheart Deal

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Protesters against gerrymandering at a March 2019 rally coinciding with Supreme Court hearings on major redistricting cases. After the court said the federal judiciary has no role in partisan redistricting cases, legal action is focused on state courts. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

North Carolina Gerrymandering Trial Could Serve As Blueprint For Other States

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Democrats are hopeful they can mobilize a religious left to counter the religious right. But it's unclear whether that outreach will resonate with voters who make up the religious middle. A-Digit/Getty Images hide caption

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A-Digit/Getty Images

Democrats Have The Religious Left. Can They Win The Religious Middle?

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Tania and Joseph's 3-year-old daughter, Sofia, plays with a car in the shade at a shelter in Juárez, Mexico, last week. Sofia has a serious heart condition and had a heart attack. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

3-Year-Old Asked To Pick Parent In Attempted Family Separation, Her Parents Say

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Sadie Roberts-Joseph founded the Odell S. Williams Now & Then African American Museum in Baton Rouge, La., in 2001. She was a prominent civil rights activist and community leader. James Terry III/NAACP Baton Rouge Chapter hide caption

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James Terry III/NAACP Baton Rouge Chapter

Tyler Holland guides his bike through the water as winds from Tropical Storm Barry push water from Lake Pontchartrain over the seawall Saturday. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

The U.S. Bureau of Land Management is recommending attendance be capped at existing levels for the next 10 years at the annual Burning Man counterculture festival in the desert 100 miles north of Reno, Nev. Burning Man organizers had proposed raising the current 80,000 limit as high as 100,000 in coming years. Ron Lewis/AP hide caption

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Ron Lewis/AP

Authorities scrambled to restore electricity to Manhattan following a power outage that knocked out Times Square's towering electronic screens and left businesses without electricity, elevators stuck and subway cars stalled. Michael Owens/AP hide caption

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Michael Owens/AP