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Members of the rock group Four O'clock Heroes, performing in 2011, used MySpace to promote their work. The social network may have lost millions of media files uploaded by users. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP

An interfaith vigil, offering prayers and support for the Muslim community, begins at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Mich., on Saturday evening. Razi Jafri/Michigan Public Radio hide caption

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Razi Jafri/Michigan Public Radio

'We Are Not Safe Unless We Are Together' — Interfaith Vigils Follow Mosque Shootings

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Nationwide, there are too few farmers to populate market stalls and too few customers filling their canvas bags with fresh produce at each market. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

Colorado state Sen. Rhonda Fields' son, Javad Marshall Fields, was killed before testifying in a murder trial with his fiancée, Vivian Wolfe. Fields, a Democrat, won't vote along party lines when it comes to abolishing the death penalty. Kathryn Scott Osler/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Kathryn Scott Osler/Denver Post via Getty Images

For Some Colorado Lawmakers, The Death Penalty Debate Is Personal

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Former speaker of the house John Boehner has emerged as one of the most vocal advocates in the GOP for legalizing marijuana. Above, Boehner answers questions at the U.S. Capitol on December 5, 2013. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

John Boehner Was Once 'Unalterably Opposed' To Marijuana. He Now Wants It To Be Legal

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A message card sits among a collection of flowers left at the Christchurch Botanic Gardens in New Zealand on Saturday. A 28-year-old white supremacist accused in the mass shootings at two mosques that left dozens of people dead stood silently before a judge on Saturday. Vincent Thian/AP hide caption

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Vincent Thian/AP

A 'Mainstreaming Of Bigotry' As White Extremism Reveals Its Global Reach

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Marijuana plants grow in a marijuana cultivation facility on July 6, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Cannabis 101 At The University Of Connecticut

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María de Jesús Caro Villa, 82, and Albano Villa, 83, are being cared for by their granddaughter, Nitzia Chama. The AARP says 1 in 4 family caregivers is a millennial. Nitzia Chama for NPR hide caption

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Nitzia Chama for NPR

As Parents And Grandparents Age, More And More Millennials Are Family Caregivers

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Shawn Esco brings his dog Nibbler to a park in Jackson, Miss. He's was diagnosed with HIV 11 years ago and has stayed healthy, but the same can't be said of many of the other HIV-positive people in his life. L. Kasimu Harris for NPR hide caption

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L. Kasimu Harris for NPR

Ending HIV In Mississippi Means Cutting Through Racism, Poverty And Homophobia

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A man leads two young boys into Friday prayers as Muslim worshippers arrive for prayer following the mosque attacks in New Zealand at the Islamic Center of Washington in Washington. Joshua Roberts/Reuters hide caption

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Joshua Roberts/Reuters

President Trump shows the executive veto of the national emergency resolution in the Oval Office of the White House Friday. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Trump Vetoes Congressional Effort To Limit Border Wall Funding

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Keitra Bates (left) moved to tears upon meeting 106-year old Leila Williams at her nursing home. Bates recently discovered that Williams once ran Leila's Dinette in the building where Bates now runs Marddy's Shared Kitchen and Marketplace. Charlotte Riley-Webb for NPR hide caption

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Charlotte Riley-Webb for NPR

'Welcome To Marrdy's' - A Shared Kitchen For Local Cooks In Gentrifying West Atlanta

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Evan Thomas breaks new ground with extraordinary access to Sandra Day O'Connor, her papers, journals — and even 20 years of her husband's diary. Mike Moore/WireImage/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Moore/WireImage/Getty Images

From Triumph To Tragedy, 'First' Tells Story Of Justice Sandra Day O'Connor

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After voters in Idaho passed Medicaid expansion by 61 percent, some state lawmakers are trying to make the process for putting citizen-driven initiatives on the ballot more difficult. James Dawson/Boise State Public Radio hide caption

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James Dawson/Boise State Public Radio

Idaho Voters Speak Up As Lawmakers Work To Make Ballot Initiative Process Harder

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Shotzy Harrison in 2013 with her father, James Flavy Coy Brown, at StoryCorps in Winston-Salem, N.C. Not long after, Brown, then 49, left his daughter's home and she hasn't seen him since. Anita Rao/StoryCorps hide caption

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Anita Rao/StoryCorps

A Father-Daughter Relationship Strained By 'Mental Illness And Time'

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