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A gray wolf is captured by a remote camera on U.S. Forest Service land in Oregon in 2017. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife/AP hide caption

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Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife/AP

Suffolk County Executive Steven Bellone announced fines on Wednesday against a Long Island, N.Y., country club and a resident for hosting events in violation of social-gathering limits. Screen grab by NPR/Suffolk County Executive/Facebook hide caption

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Screen grab by NPR/Suffolk County Executive/Facebook

Honduran migrants walking in a group stop before Guatemalan police in January near Agua Caliente, Guatemala. The Democratic staff of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee says U.S. immigration agents in Guatemala helped officials deport Hondurans traveling in a migrant caravan earlier this year. Santiago Billy/AP hide caption

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Santiago Billy/AP

A nurse conducts a coronavirus test at a mega drive-through site in July at El Paso Community College's Valle Verde campus in El Paso, Texas. Cengiz Yar/Getty Images hide caption

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Cengiz Yar/Getty Images

Amid COVID-19 Upswing, El Paso, Texas, Doctor Says ICU Is 'Surreal' And 'Strange'

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Philadelphia police issue a final warning for curfew violation to protesters at 55th and Pine Streets in West Philadelphia, on Wednesday, the third straight night of protesting and unrest after the fatal shooting of Walter Wallace Jr. by police. Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Khaled Jamal Abdullah after running away from home to pledge allegiance to ISIS and join the militant group as a fighter. He had just turned 16. Jamal Abdullah Naser hide caption

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Jamal Abdullah Naser

Iraqi Family Identifies Their Son As ISIS Teen At Center Of Navy War Crimes Trial

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Trump supporters and Trump protesters watch a passing motorcade carrying the president last month in Kenosha, Wis. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

'Guns, Protests And Elections Do Not Mix': Conflict Experts See Rising Warning Signs

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A local resident arrives to cast her ballot during early voting for the general election on Oct. 20 in Adel, Iowa. A new analysis by NPR, the Center for Public Integrity and Stateline reveals that since 2016, 261 polling places in the state have been closed, most due to COVID-19. Charlie Neibergall/AP hide caption

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Charlie Neibergall/AP

Polling Places Are Closing Due To COVID-19. It Could Tip Races In 1 Swing State

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U.S. federal agencies sent an alert Wednesday night that there is "credible information of an increased and imminent cybercrime threat" to hospitals and healthcare providers. Nicolas Asfouri/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolas Asfouri/AFP via Getty Images

Boeing will be laying off thousands of additional employees as the airplane manufacturer continues to lose money due to the coronavirus pandemic. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Protesters confront police during a march Tuesday in Philadelphia following this week's fatal police shooting of Walter Wallace Jr., a 27-year-old Black man. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

Former Department of Homeland Security chief of staff Miles Taylor, pictured in March 2018, announced he is behind the scathing anti-Trump op-ed and book published under the pen name "Anonymous." Tim Godbee/Department of Homeland Security via AP hide caption

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Tim Godbee/Department of Homeland Security via AP

C'Artis Harris, walking with her children in 2017, was searching for housing that would accept her Section 8 voucher when NPR began following her in 2016. Today, Harris and her family still live in an area of high poverty. Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR hide caption

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Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR

Trump Stokes Fear In The Suburbs, But Few Low-Income Families Ever Make It There

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Illinois Gov. JB Pritzker answers questions from the media, along with Dr. Ngozi Ezike, director of the Illinois Department of Public Health, during his daily press briefing on the COVID-19 pandemic on May 22, in Springfield, Ill. Justin L. Fowler/AP hide caption

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Justin L. Fowler/AP