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Ralphie V, mascot of the Colorado Buffaloes, is led onto the field before the team's game against the Arizona Wildcats at Folsom Field on Oct. 5 in Boulder, Colo. Matthew Stockman/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Stockman/Getty Images

Prince Andrew also answered questions about Epstein accuser Virginia Roberts Giuffre, but he maintained that he "had no recollection" of meeting her. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Two witnesses seen as crucial to the case against President Trump in the impeachment inquiry testified Wednesday. Jim Lo Scalzo/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Lo Scalzo/Getty Images

Opinion: Diplomats Called 'Deep State' Insiders Were Outsiders Fleeing Oppression

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Engraved portrait of George Clinton, a former U.S. vice president who was also New York state's first and longest-serving governor, in the late 18th century — not long after the first sign of the word gubernatorial appeared in the English language. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Where Does The Term 'Gubernatorial' Come From?

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Former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch testifies before the House Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill on Friday. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Former U.S. Ambassador To Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch's Public Testimony Part 1

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A woman and girl drop off flowers at a makeshift memorial in Central Park near Saugus High School in Santa Clarita, Calif., where a student shot five fellow teenagers Thursday. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Judge Thad Balkman listens to statements from the defense during a hearing last month in Norman, Okla. Chris Landsberger/The Oklahoman hide caption

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Chris Landsberger/The Oklahoman

Oklahoma Judge Shaves $107 Million Off Opioid Decision Against Johnson & Johnson

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Activists opposed to partisan gerrymandering hold up representations of congressional districts from North Carolina, left, and Maryland, right, ahead of Supreme Court arguments last spring. The court ultimately decided that federal courts could not adjudicate partisan gerrymandering cases. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Cleveland Browns defensive end Myles Garrett hits Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Mason Rudolph with his own helmet as offensive guard David DeCastro tries to intervene, in the final seconds of their game Thursday night. Ken Blaze/USA Today Sports / Reuters hide caption

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Ken Blaze/USA Today Sports / Reuters

Anna Wiese, 11, stands in front of a plaque in the state Capitol building commemorating Idaho's first female legislators. She originally found the plaque tucked away in a forgotten corner last year and wrote a letter to get it moved. James Dawson/Boise State Public Radio hide caption

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James Dawson/Boise State Public Radio

Idaho's 1st Female Lawmakers Properly Honored Thanks To 11-Year-Old Student

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Kevin Ross, president of the Scottish Plastics and Rubber Association, in front of the INEOS Grangemouth refinery and chemical plant. Reid Frazier/The Allegheny Front hide caption

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Reid Frazier/The Allegheny Front

Patsy and Winfred Rembert in Hamden, Conn., at their StoryCorps interview in 2017. Jacqueline Van Meter/ StoryCorps hide caption

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Jacqueline Van Meter/ StoryCorps

He Survived A Near-Lynching. 50 Years Later, He's Still Healing

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President Trump met with Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella and Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos as part of the American Technology Council in June 2017. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Justin Ruben of ParentsTogether speaks on Thursday at a press conference organized to deliver 1.5 million petitions to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The petitions are protesting proposed changes to the food stamps program that would also affect the free school lunch program. Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Parents Together hide caption

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Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Parents Together

Legend has it that some University of Michigan fans defaced the statue sometime in the 1960s, and that led to members of the Michigan State University band and other students, sitting vigil. Alec Gerstenberger/WKAR hide caption

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Alec Gerstenberger/WKAR

At Michigan State, Students Protect Their Mascot From Mischievous Rivals

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