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Authorities clear Lafayette Park in Washington, D.C., on Monday, while across the street at the White House, President Trump said he would send the military to U.S. cities if local officials don't end unrest. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Dc Homeowner Protects Protestors Storyful hide caption

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Storyful

D.C. Protesters Hail The Hero Of Swann St., Who Sheltered Them From Arrest

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David McAtee, who was shot and killed by officers early Monday morning, is seen at a grill in a security video that Louisville police released on Tuesday. LMPD/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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LMPD/Screenshot by NPR

Taniyah Pilgrim and Messiah Young address a news conference Monday at Morehouse College in Atlanta. Prosecutors have filed charges against six officers involved in the couple's arrest Saturday night. John Bazemore/AP hide caption

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John Bazemore/AP

Charlotte's Spectrum Center is scheduled to host the 2020 Republican National Convention, but GOP officials are insisting on a full arena while state public health officials say it's not safe to have so many people together in a pandemic. Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images

The endangered species carousel at the Dallas Zoo in Dallas is closed to visitors. Many states are allowing parks and other outdoor attractions to open with increased sanitation and social distancing measures in place. Tony Gutierrez/AP hide caption

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Tony Gutierrez/AP

Parkview Early Learning Center in Spokane, Wash., has been operating at one-third capacity under pandemic guidelines. Co-owner Luc Jasmin III says it has been tough to turn away parents, many of whom are essential workers. Kathryn Garras hide caption

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Kathryn Garras

President Trump's photo opportunity in front of St. John's Episcopal church in Washington has set off criticism, as law enforcement used tear gas and force to clear a path for him to walk from the White House. Tom Brenner/Reuters hide caption

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Tom Brenner/Reuters

'He Did Not Pray': Fallout Grows From Trump's Photo-Op At St. John's Church

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Protesters lie on the ground with their hands behind their backs in New York City's Times Square on Monday. Outrage over police brutality and systemic racism has spilled into the streets in cities across the country. Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images

US President Trump leaves the White House on foot to go to St John's Episcopal church across Lafayette Park in Washington, D.C. Monday. Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty Images

Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Seema Verma, pictured at a White House event last month, says her agency will be stepping up fines for nursing homes that fail to sufficiently control infections. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Adm. Brett Giroir, who has been leading federal coronavirus testing efforts, speaks during one of the daily White House coronavirus task force briefings in April. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

A fake story began circulating Sunday evening into Monday morning, which was then disputed by real journalists as well as a number of bots. Experts say the campaign may have been meant to make people question whether anything they see online is true. Twitter Screenshot hide caption

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Twitter Screenshot

'None Of This Is True': Protests Become Fertile Ground for Online Disinformation

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A woman walks past a boarded up store in downtown Los Angeles on Sunday. Professor Jody David Armour says protesters today are more diverse and have more empathy than in 1992. Agustin Paullier/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Agustin Paullier/AFP via Getty Images

USC Professor On How Protests Have Changed Since LA Riots In 1992

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