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A bar owner changed the marquee outside his bar to "Closed Again" in Houston, Texas on June 26. That day, Texas Gov. Greg Abbott ordered bars to close amid a surge in coronavirus cases. Mark Felix /AFP /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix /AFP /AFP via Getty Images

A sculpture of Juan de Oñate's settlers arriving in New Mexico is pictured as city workers remove a sculpture of the Spanish conquistador on June 16 in Albuquerque. Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images

New Mexico Leaders To Militia: If You Want To Help Community, Stop Showing Up Armed

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Lauren Moran, a pastry chef who owns a bakery and café, taste-tests Cornwall's new coffee drinks with her husband, Cornwall's general manager Billy Moran (left), and Speedwell Coffee Co. owner Derek Anderson. Tovia Smith/NPR hide caption

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Tovia Smith/NPR

Boston Tavern Pivots To 'Plan B' To Try To Survive The Pandemic

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Jovita Carranza, Administrator of the Small Business Administration, testifies during a Senate Small Business and Entrepreneurship hearing June 10, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Kevin Dietsch/AP hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/AP

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced a new set of rules for foreign students in light of the coronavirus pandemic. International students cannot enter or stay in the U.S. if their college offers courses only online in the fall semester. Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images

Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego, pictured March 3 at City Hall in Phoenix, says the city needs more help responding to the coronavirus. Anita Snow/AP hide caption

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Anita Snow/AP

Phoenix Mayor Says The City Is In A 'Crisis Situation,' Needs Help

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NASCAR Cup Series driver Bubba Wallace stands during the national anthem before a NASCAR auto race Sunday at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

Students move out of dormitories at San Diego State University in March, after the university cancelled the rest of the semester and has asked students to move out within 48 hours. Nine percent of young adults say they've moved due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Sandy Huffaker/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sandy Huffaker/AFP via Getty Images

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp slammed Atlanta officials who "have failed to quell ongoing violence" over an especially turbulent few months. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

Lines and lines of cars are seen as drivers wait on Monday to be tested for COVID-19 at a coronavirus testing site in Miami Gardens, Fla. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

In Miami, Rolling Back Openings To Contain The Coronavirus Surge

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The Manhattan district attorney says he will prosecute Amy Cooper, who called police after a black man asked her to leash her dog in New York's Central Park. Christian Cooper/AP hide caption

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Christian Cooper/AP

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms condemned weekend violence that included the killing of an 8-year-old girl. "You can't blame this on a police officer," Bottoms said. "You can't say this is about criminal justice reform." Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

A statue of the abolitionist and writer Frederick Douglass, pictured here, was torn from its base in Rochester, N.Y., on the anniversary of his famous speech "What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?" AP hide caption

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AP

Armed Black protesters exchange words with a far-right activist during a gun rights rally put on by members of the Boogaloo movement in Richmond, Va. Jim Urquhart for NPR hide caption

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Jim Urquhart for NPR

An Uneasy July 4th In Richmond, Va., As Armed Groups Gather Warily

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Georgia Tech, pictured in 2016, will be holding some in-person classes in the fall. Faculty are upset that face coverings will not be mandatory. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP