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A memorial for Breonna Taylor is shown during a march in Louisville, Ky., in August. Demonstrators have long called for the officers to face criminal charges. Amy Harris/Invision/AP hide caption

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Amy Harris/Invision/AP

Boxes of Uncle Ben Converted Rice on a store shelf. Mars, Incorporated announced on Wednesday that it is changing the name of the brand to Ben's Original. Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Machado Noa/LightRocket via Getty Images

Sizzler USA has filed for bankruptcy as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and related restrictions. Here, drivers pass a closed Sizzler restaurant in Montebello, Calif. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Huda Mohamed, a student at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va., has an immunodeficiency. She decided to take extra precautions by using Virginia's COVIDWISE app, which alerts users who may have been exposed to the coronavirus. Such apps are only available in a few states. Eman Mohammed for NPR hide caption

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Eman Mohammed for NPR

A small sign identifies the hamlet of Swastika, N.Y. When an outsider suggested the tiny northern hamlet of Swastika should change its name, town supervisors quickly rejected a change. Ben Rowe/Plattsburgh Press-Republican hide caption

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Ben Rowe/Plattsburgh Press-Republican

Swastika, New York, Is Keeping Its Name

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Buildings are engulfed in flames as a wildfire ravages Talent, Ore., on Sept. 8, 2020. Unfounded rumors that left-wing activists were behind the fires went viral on social media, thanks to amplification by conspiracy theorists and the platforms' own design. Kevin Jantzer/AP hide caption

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Kevin Jantzer/AP

Can Circuit Breakers Stop Viral Rumors On Facebook, Twitter?

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Community members and family wear shirts that read "Nana Ayudame or Nana, help me" in Spanish at a vigil for Carlos Ingram-Lopez on June 25 in Tucson, Ariz. Prosecutors have declined to pursue criminal charges over his death in police custody. Caitlin O'Hara/Getty Images hide caption

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Caitlin O'Hara/Getty Images

Louisville, Ky., Mayor Greg Fischer, here at a press conference this month, says he has no insight about when the state attorney general will make an announcement in the Breonna Taylor case but says the city must be prepared. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's guidelines for a safe Halloween during the COVID-19 pandemic include new methods of doing classic spooky activities. ArtMarie/Getty Images hide caption

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ArtMarie/Getty Images

NBA icon Michael Jordan, shown here speaking at a press conference last year, said he is forming a new NASCAR racing team and Bubba Wallace will be the driver. Chuck Burton/AP hide caption

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Chuck Burton/AP

The U.S. hit a tragic milestone Tuesday, recording more than 200,000 coronavirus deaths. Here, Chris Duncan, whose 75-year-old mother, Constance, died from COVID-19 on her birthday, visits a COVID Memorial Project installation of 20,000 U.S. flags on the National Mall. The flags are on the grounds of the Washington Monument, facing the White House. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

A worker pushes a cart past refrigerators at a Home Depot in Boston in January, before the coronavirus pandemic threw a monkey wrench into the supply and demand of major appliances. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Why It's So Hard To Buy A New Refrigerator These Days

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In this May 28, 1957, photo, Rev. Robert S. Graetz, center, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy, left, talk outside the witness room during a bombing trial in Montgomery, Ala. Graetz, the only white minister to support the Montgomery Bus Boycott, died Sunday, Sept. 20, 2020. He was 92. AP hide caption

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AP

Robert Graetz, Only White Pastor To Back Montgomery Bus Boycott, Dies At 92

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Poet and activist Christopher Coles addresses a crowd in Rochester, N.Y. His message to white protesters is a reminder: "For some of you all that come here, you come because it's an elective. We come because it's survival." Brian Mann/NPR hide caption

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Brian Mann/NPR

Black Protest Leaders To White Allies: 'It's Our Turn To Lead Our Own Fight'

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