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A new generation of states are wrestling with how to legalize marijuana with a focus on racial equity that was missing from early legalization efforts. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Former Sen. Kelly Loeffler, R-Ga., waits for Vice President Mike Pence to arrive for her swearing-in reenactment for the cameras in the Capitol in January 2020. Bill Clark/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/Getty Images

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Rochelle Walensky said on Friday that the says that the 7-day average of confirmed cases in the U.S. has ticked up for the past three days, warning that "now is not the time to relax restrictions." Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Senate parliamentarian Elizabeth MacDonough works beside then-Vice President Mike Pence earlier this year during the certification of 2020 Electoral College ballots, in the House chamber of the U.S. Capitol. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Restrictions on public gatherings and indoor dining, as well as improved rates of mask-wearing and social distancing helped bring down the rate of new coronavirus infections in the U.S. Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images hide caption

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Dia Dipasupil/Getty Images

President Biden and first lady Jill Biden step off Air Force One at Ellington Field Joint Reserve Base in Houston, where he is scheduled to speak Friday night at a vaccination site at NRG Stadium. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Tony Hicks, left, and Azim Khamisa in December 2019, in San Diego, Calif. Courtesy of the Tariq Khamisa Foundation hide caption

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Courtesy of the Tariq Khamisa Foundation

'Worth Being Forgiven': A Father And His Son's Killer Bring Past And Present Together

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Facebook is pushing back on new Apple privacy rules for its mobile devices, this time saying the social media giant is standing up for small businesses in television and radio advertisements and full page newspaper ads. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Why Is Facebook Launching An All-Out War On Apple's Upcoming iPhone Update?

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With One Move, Congress Could Lift Millions Of Children Out Of Poverty

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Millions of monarch butterflies arrive each year in Mexico after travelling, in some cases, thousands of miles from the United States and Canada. Pedro Pardo/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Pedro Pardo/AFP via Getty Images

Shattered glass is on the ground following a rocket attack in Irbil, the capital of the northern Iraqi Kurdish autonomous region, on Feb. 15. On Thursday, the U.S. launched airstrikes targeting Iranian-backed groups in eastern Syria in response to recent attacks against Americans in Iraq. Safin Hamed/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Safin Hamed/AFP via Getty Images

TikTok on Wednesday agreed to pay $92 million to settle claims stemming from a class-action lawsuit alleging the app illegally tracked and shared the personal data of users without their consent. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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Kiichiro Sato/AP

A windfarm near Velva, North Dakota. Two counties in the state have enacted drastic restrictions on new wind projects in an attempt to save coal mining jobs, despite protests from landowners who'd like to rent their land to wind energy companies. Karen Bleier/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP via Getty Images

North Dakota Officials Block Wind Power In Effort To Save Coal

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has plans to create a commission similar to the one after the Sept. 11 attacks, to investigate how Trump supporters were able to breach the Capitol complex on Jan. 6. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

The Challenge To Stop The Next Outbreak Of Homegrown, Extremist Violence In The U.S.

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The Biden administration has reopened shelters for migrant teens that were first used by the Trump administration in Carrizo Springs, Texas. Long trailers that previously housed oil workers in two-bedroom suites were turned into dorms with bunk beds, classrooms and medical care. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Biden Pledges That Border Shelter For Teens 'Won't Stay Open Very Long'

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Former USA Gymnastics women's coach John Geddert has died by suicide after facing 24 criminal counts, including human trafficking, forced labor and sexual misconduct. Above, he is seen at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. Visionhaus/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Visionhaus/Corbis via Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, seen here in July, denies allegations that he sexually harassed former adviser Lindsey Boylan. Jeenah Moon/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeenah Moon/Getty Images

Rena Logan, a member of a Cherokee Freedmen family, shows her identification card as a member of the Cherokee tribe at her home in Muskogee, Okla., in this photo from October 2011. She is among the some 8,500 people whose ancestors were enslaved by the Cherokee Nation in the 1800s. David Crenshaw/Associated Press hide caption

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David Crenshaw/Associated Press

Cherokee Nation Strikes Down Language That Limits Citizenship Rights 'By Blood'

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