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American and Mexican families play with a seesaw installation at the border near Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, in July 2019. London's Design Museum recognized the project with an award for best design of 2020. Luis Torres/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Luis Torres/AFP via Getty Images

"JESUS SAVES" banners were among those carried during a rally on Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington before rioters stormed the Capitol. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Militant Christian Nationalists Remain A Potent Force, Even After The Capitol Riot

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Dr. Rachel Levine has previously won state Senate confirmation in Pennsylvania, including a unanimous vote in 2015 to endorse her as Pennsylvania's physician general. Courtesy of Biden transition team hide caption

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Courtesy of Biden transition team

Alleged members of several different right-wing and extremist groups are facing charges in connection with the Jan. 6 siege at the U.S. Capitol. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., has a new publisher for his book The Tyranny of Big Tech. Simon & Schuster dropped the title after the deadly insurrection at the Capitol on Jan. 6, saying Hawley played a role in fomenting the mob attack that threatened House and Senate members. Patrick Semansky/AP Photo/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP Photo/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Aditya Singh, 36, is accused of hiding in a restricted area of the O'Hare International Airport in Chicago for three months. He was arrested Saturday after United Airlines staff said he possessed stolen airport credentials. Cook County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Cook County Sheriff's Office via AP

Census Bureau Director Steven Dillingham, a Trump appointee who wore a "2020 Census" mask while swearing in to testify before a congressional hearing last year, is set to leave on Jan. 20, months before his term ends on Dec. 31. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Vanderbilt kicker Sarah Fuller, pictured before a game against Missouri on Nov. 28, will be featured in a prime-time program celebrating the inauguration of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris on Wednesday. L.G. Patterson/AP hide caption

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L.G. Patterson/AP

Former Florida data scientist Rebekah Jones turned herself in to authorities Sunday night. She accuses the state of retaliating against her for speaking out about its COVID-19 policies and officials' decisions related to the pandemic. Courtesy Rebekah Jones hide caption

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Courtesy Rebekah Jones

There's plenty of social distance out on the slopes, but resorts are requiring masks in lift lines and lodges and limiting lodge use. Most skiers and boarders are happy to comply but Schweitzer Mountain in Idaho had to suspend season passes for some who refused to wear masks and were verbally abusive to lift line attendants. Schweitzer Mountain Resort hide caption

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Schweitzer Mountain Resort

Ski Down and Mask Up — Resorts Try To Stay Safe In Pandemic Skiing Boom

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Sandra's 17-year-old daughter, Lindsey, has autism. Lindsey thrives on routine, and got special help at school until the coronavirus pandemic cut her off from the trained teachers and therapists she'd come to rely on. Audra Melton for NPR hide caption

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Audra Melton for NPR

'I've Tried Everything': Pandemic Worsens Child Mental Health Crisis

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U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat from California, speaks during a news conference at the U.S. Capitol on Friday. Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., yells at journalists after setting off the metal detector outside the doors to the House of Representatives Chamber on Jan. 12. Twitter suspended the newly elected lawmaker's account temporarily on Sunday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Wednesday's inauguration, coming two weeks to the day after the insurrection on the Capitol, will be unlike any other in living memory, writes NPR's Michel Martin. Above, the Capitol building is seen as workers prepare for the inauguration ceremony for Barack Obama in 2013. J. Countess/Getty Images hide caption

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J. Countess/Getty Images

The Things I'll Miss Most On An Inauguration Day Unlike Any Other

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