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Philonise Floyd (left) and attorney Ben Crump react after a guilty verdict was announced at the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin for the murder of Floyd's brother George Floyd Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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Julio Cortez/AP

Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison, here in September, praised the witnesses and jurors in the Derek Chauvin trial on Tuesday. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

A sign at a June 2020 protest against racial injustice and police violence in Seattle bears the names of people killed by police. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

People celebrate the guilty verdict in the Dereck Chauvin trail in Minneapolis. Chauvin, a former Minneapolis police officer was found guilty of all three charges in the killing of George Floyd. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

People gather outside the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis on Tuesday before the jury's decision returning guilty verdicts against former police officer Derek Chauvin. Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

Crowds erupted in celebration in front of the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis after Derek Chauvin was found guilty on all counts. Carlos Barria/Reuters hide caption

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Carlos Barria/Reuters

Members of George Floyd's family and Rev. Al Sharpton (right) arrive at the courthouse in Minneapolis on Monday for closing arguments in the trial former police officer Derek Chauvin. Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

A protester holds a sign across the street from the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis on April 6 during the trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin. The testimony ran for three weeks. Jim Mone/AP hide caption

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Jim Mone/AP

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is taken into custody as his attorney, Eric Nelson, looks on after the verdicts were read on Tuesday at Chauvin's trial for the 2020 death of George Floyd. Court TV/AP hide caption

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Court TV/AP

A pharmacist administers a dose of a COVID-19 vaccine to a worker at a processing plant in Arkansas City, Kan., on March 5. Researchers are concerned that vaccination rates in some rural communities may not keep up with urban rates. Doug Barrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Doug Barrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images

If passed, two new bills in Congress would extend the reporting deadlines for 2020 census results, which are now months overdue after the pandemic and interference by Trump administration officials upended last year's national count. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

Defense attorney Eric Nelson (left) and former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin listen to Judge Peter Cahill read instructions to the jury before closing arguments Monday. Court TV/Pool via AP hide caption

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Court TV/Pool via AP

A lone protester stands outside the Hennepin County Courthouse on Monday as lawyers presented closing arguments in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin. The jury is now deliberating. Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (right) speaks outside the U.S. Capitol in March with other members of the U.S. House of Representatives, the size of which has stayed at 435 voting members for decades. Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

Stuck At 435 Representatives? Why The U.S. House Hasn't Grown With Census Counts

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Sulma Franco, an organizer with Mujeres Luchadoras and Grassroots Leadership and an LGBT activist from Guatemala, leads protesters on March 24 to the entrance of the T. Don Hutto Residential Center in Taylor, Texas, where U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement contracts for the detention of migrant women. Julia Robinson hide caption

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Julia Robinson

Immigrant Detention For Profit Faces Resistance After Big Expansion Under Trump

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The U.S. Department of State will add a slew of countries to its "Do Not Travel List" later this week because of coronavirus danger. Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images

A U.S. Capitol Police officer holds a program during a Feb. 3 ceremony honoring Brian Sicknick in the Capitol Rotunda. A medical examiner determined that Sicknick died of natural causes following the Jan. 6 insurrection. Demetrius Freeman/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Demetrius Freeman/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

A member of the U.S. Armed Forces administers a COVID-19 vaccine at a FEMA community vaccination center on March 2 in Philadelphia. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Makela/Getty Images

With All U.S. Adults Eligible, How Can More Be Convinced To Get Vaccinated?

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