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Stimulus checks are prepared on May 8, 2008, in Philadelphia. In 2020, stimulus checks again went to many Americans, this time during the pandemic's economic fallout. But some of that money went to thousands of foreign workers not eligible to receive the funds. Jeff Fusco/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Fusco/Getty Images

Tom Brady of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers works out during in Tampa, Fla., Tuesday. The NFL is doing daily coronavirus testing for the first two weeks of training. Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images

Poll workers must take extra precautions this year to protect themselves against the coronavirus. Election experts fear a massive shortage of workers at the polls in November. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Wanted: Young People To Work The Polls This November

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A U.S. Border Patrol vehicle is stationed in front of the U.S.-Mexico border barrier as construction continues in hard-hit Imperial County on July 22, in Calexico, Calif. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

In this 2017 file photo, Cori Bush speaks on a bullhorn to protesters outside the St. Louis Police Department headquarters. Bush is projected to top longtime Rep. William Lacy Clay in Missouri's 1st Congressional District Democratic primary. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

In this photo provided by the Australian Defence Force, an Australian Army helicopter lands on Pikelot Island in the Federated States of Micronesia to rescue three stranded mariners who had been missing for nearly three days. HOGP/AP hide caption

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HOGP/AP

Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves announced on Tuesday that masks will temporarily be required statewide and certain school districts must delay the start of in-person instruction. The state is ranked second for number of new cases per capita. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Six states have an agreement to acquire fast-result antigen tests for the coronavirus. Here, a medical worker collects a sample after a patient self-administers a nasal swab test. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

A man walks through debris near the scene of the enormous explosion in Lebanon on Tuesday. At least 70 people were killed, and at least 2,700 people were hurt. The blast shattered windows and damaged buildings across a wide swath of Beirut. STR/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP via Getty Images

Some 1,892 American flags are installed on the National Mall in Washington, DC in 2014. The Iraq and Afghanistan veterans installed the flags to represent the 1,892 veterans and service members who committed suicide this year as part of the "We've Got Your Back: IAVA's Campaign to Combat Suicide." Jewel Samad / AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad / AFP via Getty Images

A law enforcement officer raises a baton and tear gas is fired during protests near the White House on June 1. Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis speaks during a news conference Monday along with Dr. Joshua Lenchus, chief medical officer of Broward Health Medical Center. DeSantis says he's exploring ways to open nursing homes for family member visits. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

When asked in an interview whether he found the late Rep. John Lewis impressive, President Trump took credit for having done more for Black Americans than anybody else. Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images

In her new book, Caste, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Isabel Wilkerson examines the laws and practices that created what she describes as a bipolar, Black and white caste system in the United States. Above, a sign in Jackson, Miss., in May 1961. William Lovelace/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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William Lovelace/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

It's More Than Racism: Isabel Wilkerson Explains America's 'Caste' System

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Thousands of couples have been separated by pandemic-related travel restrictions. Lots of them are unmarried. Johannes Mahele and Joresa Blount; Corsi Crumple and Sean Donovan; Todd Alsup and Sebastian Pinde hide caption

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Johannes Mahele and Joresa Blount; Corsi Crumple and Sean Donovan; Todd Alsup and Sebastian Pinde

Can Love Conquer Travel Bans? Couples Divided By Pandemic Are Rallying To Reunite

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Vaccine-makers are readying 190 million doses of the flu vaccine for deployment across the U.S. this fall — 20 million more doses than in a typical year. A nasal spray version will be available, as well as shots. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images