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Men prepare to hang a huge portrait of Ebrahim Raisi outside the Islamic republic's embassy in Baghdad during a condolences service on Monday. Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP via Getty Images

What to expect next after the sudden death of Iran's president

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A Miami police officer talks with a homeless person, prior to a cleaning of the street in 2021. Starting October 1st, a new law will ban Florida's homeless from sleeping in public spaces. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Amid record homelessness, a Texas think tank tries to upend how states tackle it

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The International Criminal Court building in The Hague, Netherlands, on April 30. Selman Aksunger/Anadolu/Getty Images hide caption

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Selman Aksunger/Anadolu/Getty Images

This Red Lobster in Maryland was among dozens of locations that closed abruptly ahead of the restaurant's bankruptcy filing. Alina Selyukh/NPR hide caption

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Alina Selyukh/NPR

Red Lobster files for bankruptcy after missteps including all-you-can-eat shrimp

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In this photo released by the Iranian first vice president's office, Iranian First Vice President Mohammad Mokhber, right, now acting President of the Islamic Republic of Iran, leads a cabinet meeting in Tehran on Monday. AP hide caption

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AP

Former South African President Jacob Zuma arrives at Orlando stadium in the township of Soweto, Johannesburg, South Africa, for the launch of his newly formed uMkhonto weSizwe (MK) party's manifesto Saturday, May 18, 2024. Jerome Delay/AP hide caption

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Jerome Delay/AP

Children in Nasarawa, Nigeria, hold samples of their urine specimens. Blood in the urine is a sign of Schistosomiasis, a microscopic worm that, left untreated, can damage organs as well as cause learning delays. A new pill has been developed to treat preschoolers. Wes Pope/Chicago Tribune/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Wes Pope/Chicago Tribune/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Supporters of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, fly a banner featuring an image of Assange, as they protest in support of him, outside The Royal Courts of Justice, Britain's High Court, in central London on Monday. Benjamin Cremel/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Benjamin Cremel/AFP/Getty Images

In this handout image supplied by the Office of the President of the Islamic Republic of Iran, Iranian President Ebrahim Raisi is pictured at the Qiz Qalasi Dam, constructed on the Aras River on the joint borders between Iran and Azerbaijan. Raisi was seen as a potential successor to Iran's supreme leader. Handout/Office of the President of the Islamic Republic of Iran via Getty Images hide caption

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Handout/Office of the President of the Islamic Republic of Iran via Getty Images

Iran's president dies in helicopter crash; Michael Cohen's cross-examination wraps up

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A large new study shows people who bike have less knee pain and arthritis than those who do not. PamelaJoeMcFarlane/Getty Images hide caption

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PamelaJoeMcFarlane/Getty Images

Like to bike? Your knees will thank you and you may live longer, too

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Former President Donald Trump speaks to the media after the day's proceedings in his criminal trial at Manhattan Criminal Court on Thursday in New York City. Steven Hirsch/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Steven Hirsch/Pool/Getty Images

A sea otter in Monterey Bay with a rock anvil on its belly and a scallop in its forepaws. Jessica Fujii hide caption

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Jessica Fujii

When sea otters lose their favorite foods, they can use tools to go after new ones

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Patricia Nieshoff and her son Edward, circa 2006. Patricia Nieshoff hide caption

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Patricia Nieshoff

She was a single mom, alone at hospital with her son. Then a familiar face appeared

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Rwanda's post-genocide transformation has been remarkable, but uneven. Jacques Nkinzingabo for NPR hide caption

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Jacques Nkinzingabo for NPR

Rwanda is transforming and growing — but at what cost?

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In this handout image supplied by the Office of the President of the Islamic Republic of Iran, Iranian President Ebrahim Raisi is pictured at the Qiz Qalasi Dam, constructed on the Aras River on the joint borders between Iran and Azerbaijan. Raisi was seen as a potential successor to Iran's supreme leader. Office of the President of the Islamic Republic of Iran via Getty Images hide caption

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Office of the President of the Islamic Republic of Iran via Getty Images
wildestanimal/Getty Images

Sperm whale families talk a lot. Researchers are trying to decode what they're saying

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