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Catherine Fitzgerald, the author's mother, spent four nights in a hospital after falling in her home. But Medicare refused to pay for her rehab care, claiming she had only been an inpatient for one night. Alison Kodjak/NPR hide caption

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Alison Kodjak/NPR

Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez and party leaders say they're suing Russia, WikiLeaks and the Trump campaign for an alleged conspiracy targeting the 2016 presidential campaign. Branden Camp/AP hide caption

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Branden Camp/AP

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is levying a $1 billion fine against Wells Fargo as punishment for the banking giant's actions in its mortgage and auto loan businesses. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten speaks at a news conference on American labor on Capitol Hill in Washington in November. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Tim Ma prepares a duck confit salad at his restaurant, Kyirisan, in Washington, D.C. Ma says being mindful about reducing food waste is an integral part of his philosophy in the kitchen — not just for environmental reasons but also for profitability. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan/NPR

Democratic candidate Hiral Tipirneni campaigns in Arizona's 8th Congressional District northwest of Phoenix. Tipirneni faces Republican Debbie Lesko in a special election next week. Bret Jaspers/KJZZ hide caption

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Bret Jaspers/KJZZ

West Delta 105 E is an oil-producing platform located a dozen miles off the Louisiana coast in the Gulf of Mexico. A 2014 explosion on the lower deck killed Jerrel "Bubba" Hancock. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement hide caption

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Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement

8 Years After Deepwater Horizon Explosion, Is Another Disaster Waiting To Happen?

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Rashon Nelson (left) and Donte Robinson say they hope their arrest at a Philadelphia Starbucks one week ago helps elicit change and doesn't happen to anyone else. A video of their arrest, viewed 11 million times, has sparked outrage and protest. Jacqueline Larma/AP hide caption

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Jacqueline Larma/AP

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says a recent E.coli outbreak is linked to romaine lettuce grown in Yuma, Ariz. At least 53 people have reported illnesses, 31 have been hospitalized. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

An illustration from 1870 shows Prehistoric men using wooden clubs and stone axe to fend off an attacks by a large cave bear. The cave bear (Ursus spelaeus) was a species of bear that lived in Europe during the Pleistocene and became extinct at the beginning of the Last Glacial Maximum, about 27,500 years ago. Mammoths can be seen in the background. British Library/Science Source hide caption

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British Library/Science Source

New Study Says Ancient Humans Hunted Big Mammals To Extinction

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Sir Alan Parker stepped down as chair of Save the Children International Thursday, following accusations against former leadership at the charity. Donald Traill/Donald Traill/Invision/AP hide caption

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Donald Traill/Donald Traill/Invision/AP

Prosecutors said former 911 operator Crenshanda Williams was involved in thousands of very short emergency calls, triggering suspicion. Houston Police Department via Reuters hide caption

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Houston Police Department via Reuters

Walter Leroy Moody, seen in a photo provided by the Alabama Department of Corrections, targeted the NAACP and the federal court system with bombs in 1989. Alabama Department of Corrections via AP hide caption

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Alabama Department of Corrections via AP

South African Government Ramping Up Efforts To Get More Land Into Black Ownership

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