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Protesters held a rally in March at San Francisco's Embarcadero Plaza in solidarity with Asian Americans who have recently been the targets of hate crimes across the United States. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A bishop receives a vaccine for COVID-19 at Juba Teaching Hospital on April 7 in Juba, South Sudan. South Sudan received 132,000 doses of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine on March 25 through the World Health Organization's COVAX program to ensure all countries have equal access to vaccines. Andreea Campeanu/Getty Images hide caption

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Andreea Campeanu/Getty Images

They Desperately Need COVID Vaccines. So Why Are Some Countries Throwing Out Doses?

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The bottle of Pétrus 2000 spent 14 months on the International Space Station. It will be sold alongside a "terrestrial" bottle of the same vintage. Christie's Images Ltd. 2021 hide caption

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Christie's Images Ltd. 2021

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis speaks to the media about the cruise industry during a press conference at PortMiami in April. DeSantis faces criticism for failing to do all he could on Florida's biggest environmental threat: climate change. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Ron DeSantis Pushes Coastal 'Resilience' While Doing Little To Tackle Climate Change

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Ed Ward, photographed in the Rolling Stone office in December, 1970 in San Francisco. Robert Altman/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Altman/Getty Images

Ed Ward, Rock Critic And Historian, Dead At 72

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A patient breathes with the help of oxygen provided at a tent installed at a gurdwara, a place of worship for Sikhs, in Ghaziabad, India, on May 2. Sajjad Hussain/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sajjad Hussain/AFP via Getty Images

Why Is India Running Out Of Oxygen?

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An election campaign billboard for the Likud party shows its leader, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (left), and opposition party leader Yair Lapid, in Ramat Gan, Israel, days before that country's election in March. The banner reads "Lapid or Netanyahu." Spray paint on Netanyahu's portrait reads, "Go home." Oded Balilty/AP hide caption

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Oded Balilty/AP

Mixing different kinds of COVID-19 vaccines might help boost immune responses, but the idea has been slow to catch on. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Giving 2 Doses Of Different COVID-19 Vaccines Could Boost Immune Response

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Support for Rep. Liz Cheney, seen here on April 20, is crumbling as Rep. Steve Scalise, the second-ranking House Republican, is publicly supporting her ouster from the GOP leadership. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Peloton Interactive Inc. is recalling its Tread+ (above) and Tread exercise machines after at least 72 reports of injuries, including the death of a 6-year-old boy. Peloton Interactive Inc. hide caption

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Peloton Interactive Inc.

Matthew Carnes prepares to change diapers for his newborn daughter, Evelina Carnes, as his wife, Breanna Llamas, keeps watch in the postpartum unit at Providence St. Mary Medical Center in Apple Valley, Calif., in March. The U.S. has reported another record low in its birthrate. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Jason Brissett, a kitchen worker who came to the U.S. last month from Jamaica through an H-2B visa, is bracing for 80-hour workweeks this summer to make up for staffing shortages. Tovia Smith/NPR hide caption

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Tovia Smith/NPR

Hotels And Restaurants That Survived Pandemic Face New Challenge: Staffing Shortages

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Secretary of State Antony Blinken attends a news conference with India's Foreign Minister Subrahmanyam Jaishankar following a bilateral meeting in London on Monday during the G-7 foreign ministers meeting. Ben Stansall/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Stansall/AFP via Getty Images

Vivek Murthy testifies at his Senate confirmation hearing to be surgeon general on Feb. 25. Murthy tells NPR there's more work to do in convincing people, especially in rural communities, to get vaccinated against COVID-19. Caroline Brehman/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Caroline Brehman/AFP via Getty Images

Local 'Trusted Messengers' Key To Boosting COVID Vaccinations, Surgeon General Says

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