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Wednesday, June 19th, 2019

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Workers makes shoes at a factory in Jinjiang, in southeast China's Fujian province. Nearly all shoes sold in the U.S. are foreign-made. China's share has declined, but it's still a major source. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Why The American Shoe Disappeared And Why It's So Hard To Bring It Back

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This oblique view of the Himalayan landscape was captured by a KH-9 Hexagon satellite on Dec. 20, 1975, on the border between eastern Nepal and Sikkim, India. Josh Maurer/LDEO hide caption

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Josh Maurer/LDEO

Jeelan, 11, the day after being rescued from an ISIS family who had held her captive for the past two years. She says she doesn't remember her Yazidi family. "I want to go back to Um Ali," she says, referring to the Iraqi woman who had been pretending to be her mother in a detention camp for ISIS families. "Um Ali is my real family." Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

Fanny Law, seen in a 2017 interview with The South China Morning Post, is a member of Hong Kong's Executive Council. She apologized on Wednesday for underestimating the backlash to a controversial now-withdrawn extradition bill. K. Y. Cheng/South China Morning Post via Getty Images hide caption

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K. Y. Cheng/South China Morning Post via Getty Images

Patients operated on by surgeons who display rude or unprofessional behavior toward colleagues tend to have higher rates of post-surgical complications. FangXiaNuo/Getty Images hide caption

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FangXiaNuo/Getty Images

President Trump speaks Tuesday during a rally at the Amway Center in Orlando, Fla., where he announced his candidacy for a second presidential term. President Trump is set to run against a wide-open Democratic field of candidates, which he is trying to define as extreme. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Joy Harjo will become the 23rd poet laureate of the United States, making her the first Native American to hold the position. Shawn Miller/Library of Congress hide caption

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Shawn Miller/Library of Congress

Joy Harjo Becomes The First Native American U.S. Poet Laureate

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The White House will honor economist Art Laffer with a Medal of Freedom. Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post/Getty Images

From A Napkin To A White House Medal — The Path Of A Controversial Economic Idea

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U.S. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. She is the sponsor of H.R. 40, the bill to establish a commission to study reparations. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Diamond brooch with five different cuts of diamonds (left), Shah Jahan's dagger and The Mirror of Paradise is a 52.58-carat diamond ring are part of an auction expected to fetch more than $115 million. Christie's hide caption

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Christie's

Rohingya refugees gather in the "no man's land" behind Myanmar's barbed-wire-lined border in Maungdaw district, Rakhine state, in 2018. Some 700,000 refugees fled into Bangladesh following a brutal crackdown by the Myanmar military in 2017. Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images

A tugboat operator secures a floating razor wire security fence during an emergency response exercise at the Kinder Morgan Inc. Westridge Marine Terminal in Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada, last September. A new expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline would significantly expand tanker traffic in the region. Darryl Dyck/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Darryl Dyck/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Former White House communications director Hope Hicks arrives for a closed-door interview with the House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Flames consume a home in Paradise, Calif. PG&E will pay the town and other jurisdictions $1 billion for wildfire damage caused by its equipment. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

California Utility PG&E To Pay $1 Billion To Local Governments For Wildfire Damage

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Sam Rowe for NPR

U.S. Schools Underreport How Often Students Are Restrained Or Secluded, Watchdog Says

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