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Starbucks is opening its first deaf-friendly store in the U.S., where employees will be versed in American Sign Language and stores will be designed to better serve deaf people. Courtesy of Starbucks hide caption

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Courtesy of Starbucks

Florence Machinga, a candidate for the opposition MDC party, looks out the window of her house, which was burned down 10 years ago by an angry mob. The incident was one in a wave of violence carried out against MDC supporters in 2008. Machinga is still slowly rebuilding the home. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Survivors Of Political Violence 'Will Make Sure There's Peace' In Zimbabwe's Election

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Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos issued new guidance last fall on how campuses should handle accusations of sexual assault. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Trump Administration Defends Campus Sexual Assault Rules

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Seifullah Chapman — seen here third from right, in a court sketch from a hearing in 2004 — should be freed on supervised release, a federal judge has ruled. Dana Verkouteren/AP hide caption

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Dana Verkouteren/AP

A pharmacy technician prepares syringes containing an injectable anesthetic in the sterile medicines area of the inpatient pharmacy at the University of Utah Hospital in Salt Lake City. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Doctors Raise Alarm About Shortages Of Pain Medications

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President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin answer questions during a joint news conference after their summit on July 16 in Helsinki. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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Is Trump The Toughest Ever On Russia?

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Ballots in New York City ahead of the 2016 general elections. While U.S. election officials have made progress increasing security, gaps still remain. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Week Of Trump Reversals Puts 2018 Election Security In The Spotlight

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Miami Dolphins players kneel during the national anthem before their game against the Carolina Panthers at Bank of America Stadium on Nov. 13, 2017, in Charlotte, N.C. Grant Halverson/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandy and De'Marchoe Carpenter got married two years ago — 13 days after he was released from prison. They started dating in 1994, but before they had their first kiss, he was arrested for a crime he didn't commit. Kevin Oliver/StoryCorps hide caption

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Kevin Oliver/StoryCorps

He Was Wrongly Convicted When They Were Teens. Now They're Building Their Lives Together

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A sign marks the entrance to a VA Hospital in Hines, Ill. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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VA Whistleblowers 10 Times More Likely Than Peers To Receive Disciplinary Action

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A hotel employee prepares coconut husks for recycling into rope at the luxury Soneva Fushi island resort in the Maldives. It's just one of many initiatives the resort is taking to reduce food waste. Amal Jayasinghe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Amal Jayasinghe/AFP/Getty Images

Participants at a global security conference in Moscow in April gather near a big screen showing a Russian warplane unloading its weapons over a target in Syria. Russia became involved in the Syrian civil war in 2015 in support of its ally President Bashar Assad. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

Russia Says Agreements Were Discussed With Trump On Syria. The U.S. Is Silent

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Kathy Kraninger, President Trump's nominee to run the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, testifies before the Senate Banking Committee on Thursday. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Democratic Senators Slam Trump's Pick To Run Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

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The California state flag flies outside City Hall in Los Angeles. A bid to ask voters if they want to split California into three separate states has been stymied by the state Supreme Court. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images