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California Gov. Jerry Brown during a news conference to announce emergency drought legislation in 2015. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Jerry Brown's Exit Interview: Don't Say He Didn't Warn You

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Supporters Ada Yu and Wade Meng (no relation) stand outside the British Columbia Supreme Court on Monday before the bail hearing for Huawei Technologies CFO Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver. Rich Lam/Getty Images hide caption

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Rich Lam/Getty Images

British Prime Minister Theresa May (center) leaves a meeting Tuesday in Berlin beside German Chancellor Angela Merkel. Faced with turmoil back home, May has embarked on an international trip to shore up assurances from the European Union. Michael Sohn/AP hide caption

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Michael Sohn/AP

With a partial government shutdown on the horizon, President Trump and Democratic leaders had a heated exchange over border security and wall funding in front of reporters. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

In Fight With 'Chuck And Nancy,' Trump Says He'd Be 'Proud' To Shut Down Government

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On Tuesday, jurors sentenced James Alex Fields Jr. to 419 years plus life and roughly half a million dollars in fines. A judge will hold a separate hearing on March 29. Eze Amos/AP hide caption

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Eze Amos/AP

Charlottesville Jury Recommends 419 Years Plus Life For Neo-Nazi Who Killed Protester

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Representatives of the Houthi rebel delegation (left) and the Yemeni government's delegation (right) pose for a picture with representatives from the office of the U.N. Special Envoy for Yemen and the International Committee of the Red Cross on Tuesday, during peace talks at Johannesberg Castle in Rimbo, Sweden. Claudio Bresciani/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Claudio Bresciani/AFP/Getty Images

The Trump administration wants to limit the scope of a major clean water rule. It says the EPA under President Obama went too far in regulating isolated waters and wetlands far upstream from navigable lakes and rivers. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP

Trump EPA Proposes Major Rollback Of Federal Water Protections

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A customer holds a McDonald's Big Mac. The fast-food giant, one of the world's biggest beef buyers, has announced plans to use its might to cut back on antibiotics in its global beef supply. Environmentalists are applauding the commitment. Christoph Schmidt/Picture Alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Christoph Schmidt/Picture Alliance via Getty Images

More Americans would prefer that President Trump compromise on funding for his border wall rather than risk a government shutdown, a new poll finds. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP

The BMW Vision iNEXT autonomous electric car is previewed at a special event ahead of the LA Auto Show on Nov. 27. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

The Revolution Will Be Driverless: Autonomous Cars Usher In Big Changes

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The shortage is a nationwide problem. And the cause, according to the drug's manufacturer, GlaxoSmithKline, is simple: "Unprecedented demand." Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images

A U.S. Navy plane flies above a Japan Coast Guard patrol vessel during search-and-rescue efforts last week off the coast of Kochi prefecture, in southern Japan. Kyodo via Reuters hide caption

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Kyodo via Reuters

Time magazine is printing four covers for its "Person of the Year" issue, featuring Jamal Khashoggi, top left, members of the Capital Gazette newspaper staff, top right, Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo, bottom left, and Maria Ressa. Time Magazine/AP hide caption

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Time Magazine/AP

After being stalled in negotiations for months, mostly around disputes over SNAP, the farm bill the conference report has been released. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Farm Bill Compromise Reached With SNAP Changes Out, Industrial Hemp In

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The USNS Comfort, a U.S. Navy medical ship, floats off the coast of Riohacha, Colombia. The medical vessel is on a four-country tour of the region, providing medical assistance. Jim Wyss/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Wyss/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images

U.S. Navy Sends Hospital Ship To Colombia To Treat Venezuelan Migrants

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Yemeni militiamen stand guard at the port in Mukalla, on the southern coast of Yemen. Many factions are involved in Yemen's civil war. The U.S. has supported Saudi Arabia, which has waged a bombing campaign against Houthi rebels. But the U.S. Congress is putting pressure on the Trump administration to end its support of a war that's widely seen as a stalemate and a humanitarian disaster. Jon Gambrell/AP hide caption

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Jon Gambrell/AP

Often Quiet On Wars, Congress Challenges White House Over Yemen

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