News: U.S. and World News Headlines NPR news, audio, and podcasts. Coverage of breaking stories, national and world news, politics, business, science, technology, and extended coverage of major national and world events.

News

Floods in Ellicott City, Maryland, pushed cars into a pile last May. This year has been a year of record rainfall for cities throughout the mid-Atlantic and Carolinas. The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Michael Cohen, President Trump's former personal attorney, arrives at federal court for his sentencing hearing on Wednesday in New York City. He was sentenced to three years in prison. Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images

The 2016 viral photo of a couple passed out in a car while a child sits in the back seat triggered a painful moment of self-reflection in East Liverpool, Ohio. The community took steps to address its addiction problem, but progress has been spotty. Ian Brown for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ian Brown for NPR

Manager Brian Murray of Jersey Mike's in Thousand Oaks, Calif. The store donated one half of a day's proceeds to a fund for the families of victims of the Borderline Bar & Grill shooting. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ina Jaffe/NPR

After The Thousand Oaks' Shooting, A Community-Wide Effort To Memorialize And Heal

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/676521424/676590185" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump's former lawyer, says Trump directed him to arrange hush-money payments to two women during the closing weeks of the 2016 presidential campaign. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Craig Ruttle/AP

Actress Eliza Dushku reached a $9.5 million settlement with CBS last year after she alleged she was written off Bull because she had made a sexual harassment complaint against the show's lead. Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images

Under Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, the department took a series of steps to try to delay borrower defense from going into effect. Cheriss May/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Cheriss May/Getty Images

Defeated In Court, Education Dept. To Cancel $150 Million Of Student Loan Debt

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/676755770/676936722" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Downed trees mark the route of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline in Deerfield, Va., in February. A federal appeals court has blocked development of portions of the pipeline. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Helber/AP

Central American migrants walk along the U.S. border fence looking for places to cross, in Tijuana, Mexico. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rebecca Blackwell/AP

7-Year-Old Migrant Girl Dies Of Dehydration And Shock In U.S. Border Patrol Custody

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/676622047/676703521" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Facebook employees talk to visitors at a one-day Facebook pop-up kiosk in Bryant Park in New York City on Thursday. The company was fielding questions about its data-sharing practices and teaching users how to understand its new privacy controls. The next day, Facebook announced that a "bug" that had inappropriately shared users' private data — this time, their photos. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

Though he is best-known for his auteur work, composer, playwright and actor Lin-Manuel Miranda says it was his dream to be offered a part in someone else's musical. Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elias Williams for NPR

Lin-Manuel Miranda On 'Mary Poppins Returns' And Writing His Way Onstage

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/675379533/676901062" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts (center), is just one of several potential 2020 presidential candidates who came out in support of Sanders' Medicare for All proposal in 2017. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

People who earn up to 400 percent of the poverty level (about $48,500 for an individual and $100,400 for a family of four in 2019) are eligible for subsidies of the cost of their marketplace health plans. But many of the 5 million who aren't eligible feel crushed by rising costs. Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stuart Kinlough/Ikon Images/Getty Images

The Sandy Hook Promise, a non-profit group formed after the 2012 Connecticut shooting, is training students to spot warning signs in other would–be shooters and to anonymously report concerns through a mobile app. Courtesy Sandy Hook Promise hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy Sandy Hook Promise

'It's Preventable': Sandy Hook Parents Promote App For Reporting School Threats

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/676375851/676669233" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Every summer, downy mildew spreads from Florida northward, adapting to nearly every defense pickle growers have in their arsenals and destroying their crops. Bernd Settnik/Picture Alliance via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bernd Settnik/Picture Alliance via Getty Images

Grammy-winning singer Nancy Wilson performs in 2003 at Lincoln Center's Avery Fisher Hall in New York during a concert titled "Nancy Wilson With Strings: Celebrating Four Decades of Music." Stuart Ramson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Stuart Ramson/AP