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Producer Scott Rudin, center, and the cast of Hello, Dolly! accept the award for Best Revival of a Musical at the 2017 Tony Awards in New York City. Rudin says he's stepping back from his Broadway work. Theo Wargo/Getty Images for Tony Awards Productions hide caption

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Theo Wargo/Getty Images for Tony Awards Productions

People wait for their turn to receive the COVID-19 vaccine at a government hospital in Chennai, India, on Friday. Arun Sankar/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Arun Sankar/AFP via Getty Images

What Can Wealthy Nations Do To Address Global Vaccine Inequity?

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President Biden promotes his American Jobs Plan during an appearance in the South Court Auditorium on the White House campus on April 7. The sheer scale of his early agenda has drawn comparisons to the achievements of FDR and LBJ. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Michael Carvajal, the director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons, speaking to the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc. via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc. via Getty Images

Jerry Falwell Jr., pictured at the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, is the subject of a new lawsuit by Liberty University, his former employer. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

You can do a lot of things with minimal risk after being vaccinated. Although our public health expert says that maybe it's not quite time for a rave or other tightly packed events. Above: Fans take photographs of Megan Thee Stallion at a London show in 2019. Ollie Millington/Getty Images hide caption

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Ollie Millington/Getty Images

Billy McFarland, pictured leaving federal court in March 2018, was sentenced to six years in prison after pleading guilty to fraud charges related to the failed Fyre Festival. Ticket holders and event organizers reached a settlement in a class-action suit this week. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov addresses the media Friday in Moscow. Lavrov announced that Russia will expel 10 U.S. diplomats. The move comes after the Biden administration ordered 10 Russian diplomats to leave the U.S. a day earlier. Yuri Kochetkov/Pool via AP hide caption

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Yuri Kochetkov/Pool via AP

Raúl Castro, first secretary of the Cuban Communist Party and the country's former president, clasps hands with Cuban President Miguel Mario Díaz-Canel Bermúdez during the closing session at the National Assembly of Popular Power in 2019 in Havana. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Georgetown Law School professor Paul Butler testifies before a House Judiciary Committee hearing on policing practices and law enforcement accountability in June 2020. In an NPR interview, Butler says police in Brooklyn Center, Minn., didn't need to pursue Daunte Wright over an outstanding warrant. Mandel Ngan/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/Pool/Getty Images

Law Professor: Police Hold 'Extraordinary' Power Over Black People In Traffic Stops

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In a letter to the White House, 24 senators said the U.S. military prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba "has damaged America's reputation, fueled anti-Muslim bigotry, and weakened the United States' ability to counter terrorism and fight for human rights and the rule of law around the world." Maren Hennemuth/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Maren Hennemuth/picture alliance via Getty Images

Senators Urge Biden To Shut Down Guantánamo, Calling It A 'Symbol Of Lawlessness'

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Reps. Ilhan Omar (from left), Rashida Tlaib and Ayanna Pressley, seen here at a news conference last month outside the U.S. Capitol, are among those calling on the Biden administration to lift the cap on refugees. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Protesters gathered at a memorial a Louisville, Ky. park on March 13, 2021, the anniversary of Breonna Taylor's killing. Jonathan Mattingly, one of the officers involved in the fatal raid, is facing widespread criticism for planning to publish a book about it. Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

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Timothy D. Easley/AP

In an update on COVID-19 Wednesday, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer discussed the state's efforts to expand the use of monoclonal antibody therapy to help those diagnosed with COVID-19 avoid hospitalization. Michigan Office of the Governor/AP hide caption

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Michigan Office of the Governor/AP

Antibody Drugs For COVID-19 Are A Cumbersome Tool Against Surges

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Lab assistant Tammy Brown dons personal protective equipment in a lab at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. She works on preparing positive coronavirus tests for sequencing to discern variants rapidly spreading throughout the country. Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post via Getty Images