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Facebook parent Meta appears to be more concerned with avoiding "provoking" VIPs than balancing tricky questions of free speech and safety, its oversight board said. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Mourners gather outside Club Q to visit a memorial, which has been moved from a sidewalk outside of police tape that was surrounding the club, on Friday, Nov. 25, 2022, in Colorado Spring, Colo. Parker Seibold/AP hide caption

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Parker Seibold/AP

Boxer Legnis Cala, center, talks with fellow female boxers during a training session in Havana, Cuba, Monday, Dec. 5, 2022. Cuban officials announced on Monday that women boxers would be able to compete for the first time ever. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

Oleh Mahlay, the artistic director of the Bandurist Choir, conducts members of the Ukrainian Bandurist Chorus of North America and Ukrainian Children's Choir at New York City's Carnegie Hall on Sunday. Fadi Kheir hide caption

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Fadi Kheir

U.S. Capitol Police Chief J. Thomas Manger will speak on behalf of his department at a Congressional Gold Medal ceremony for his officers who defended the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Capitol Police chief: Jan. 6 failures 'largely' fixed but extremism threat persists

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Technicians from DTEK, Ukraine's largest private energy company, work to replace a cable at a substation in the Teremky neighborhood of Kyiv on Wednesday. Pete Kiehart for NPR hide caption

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Pete Kiehart for NPR

A thylacine or 'Tasmanian tiger' in captivity, circa 1930. These animals are thought to be extinct, since the last known wild thylacine was shot in 1930 and the last captive one died in 1936. Topical Press Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Topical Press Agency/Getty Images

A congressional report found financial technology companies, or fintechs, largely fueled PPP loan fraud. Bluevine, a fintech noted in the report, told NPR it adapted to threats of fraud better than other companies mentioned. SOPA Images/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett hide caption

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SOPA Images/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Gett

A congressional report says financial technology companies fueled rampant PPP fraud

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Chelsea Banning watched in disbelief as authors like Neil Gaiman and Margaret Atwood told her of their experiences with low turnout at book signing events. Chelsea Banning/Chelsea Banning hide caption

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Chelsea Banning/Chelsea Banning

The central business district skyline is seen during the dusk in Jakarta, Indonesia, Monday, April 29, 2019. Indonesia's Parliament has passed a long-awaited and controversial revision of its penal code, Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2022, that criminalizes extramarital sex and applies to citizens and visiting foreigners alike. Dita Alangkara/AP hide caption

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Dita Alangkara/AP

Kirstie Alley attends the premiere of HBO's "Girls" on Jan. 5, 2015, in New York. Alley, a two-time Emmy winner who starred in the 1980s sitcom "Cheers" and the hit film "Look Who's Talking," has died. She was 71. Evan Agostini/Invision hide caption

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Evan Agostini/Invision

Former Chinese President Jiang Zemin gestures as he thanks reporters for coming to a photo opportunity in Beijing's Great Hall of the People on Sept. 19, 1997. Jiang died on Nov. 30 at age 96. Will Burgess/Reuters hide caption

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Will Burgess/Reuters

A gunfire attack on two electrical substations in Moore County, N.C., knocked out power to the region, including to stoplights in the town of Southern Pines. Karl B DeBlaker/AP hide caption

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Karl B DeBlaker/AP

Traffic passes through Tonopah, Nev. on Oct. 6, 2022. Bridget Bennett for NPR hide caption

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Bridget Bennett for NPR

There's a lithium mining boom, but it's not a jobs bonanza

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Croatia players celebrate after winning the tournament's first penalty shoot out during the 2022 World Cup round of 16 match between Japan and Croatia at Al Janoub Stadium on December 05, 2022 in Al Wakrah, Qatar. Dan Mullan/Getty Images hide caption

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Svitlana (center) and Anastasiya (bottom) take shelter with their McDonald's coworkers in Lva Tolstoho Metro during an air alert in Kyiv on Monday. Russia renewed its missile attacks across Ukraine on Monday. Pete Kiehart for NPR hide caption

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Pete Kiehart for NPR

Civilians take shelter in Akademmistechko Metro during an air alert on Monday in Kyiv, Ukraine. Russia renewed its missile attacks across Ukraine on Monday. Pete Kiehart for NPR hide caption

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Pete Kiehart for NPR

To close America's remaining coal plants, many industry analysts believe the country needs natural gas to ensure reliable energy supplies until cleaner options like battery storage are widely available. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The U.S. wants to slash carbon emissions from power plants. Natural gas is in the way

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