News: U.S. and World News Headlines NPR news, audio, and podcasts. Coverage of breaking stories, national and world news, politics, business, science, technology, and extended coverage of major national and world events.

Schoolchildren are led through a dance routine at a U.S. government-supported childcare center in Raqqa. Greg Dixon/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Greg Dixon/NPR

In Syria, A School Helps Children Traumatized By War

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/657010704/658253891" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Seth Frotman, former student loan ombudsman at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, poses at NPR headquarters in September. Frotman and his team reviewed thousands of complaints about the questionable practices of student loan companies. Cameron Pollack/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Cameron Pollack/NPR

Democratic leaders including Rep. Jerry Nadler of New York faulted the White House on Wednesday for what they called "irresponsible" lumping of dissimilar Chinese and Russian influence schemes. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Carolyn Kaster/AP

A British advertising watchdog group ruled on Wednesday that the Spotify horror ad is "likely to cause undue distress to children." Chester Bennington Original Source/Screenshot by NPR/Chester Bennington hide caption

toggle caption
Chester Bennington Original Source/Screenshot by NPR/Chester Bennington

Derrick Slaughter attends a July 14, 2017, march through the streets of Norwalk, Ohio, against the epidemic of heroin, with his grandmother (not shown). Both of Derrick's parents are heroin addicts and he is now being raised by his grandparents. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Black men are twice as likely as whites to die from prostate cancer, one of the deadliest cancers that affect males. Tetra Images/Getty Images/Tetra images RF hide caption

toggle caption
Tetra Images/Getty Images/Tetra images RF

The authors of a new study on veterinarians and mental health say vet school should include more training on how to cope with the moral distress vets face when asked by pet owners to do things that are against their medical judgement. Anya Semenoff/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anya Semenoff/Denver Post via Getty Images

Employees work on the assembly line of the Tiguan model at the Volkswagen car plant in Puebla, central Mexico, in March. The auto sector is a key focus of the newly revised North American Free Trade Agreement. Pedro Pardo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pedro Pardo/AFP/Getty Images

Gaston County Elections Director Adam Ragan tests equipment. Alexandra Olgin/WFAE hide caption

toggle caption
Alexandra Olgin/WFAE

Early Voting Changes In North Carolina Spark Bipartisan Controversy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/657928248/658057272" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A view of New York City from the Empire State Building on Tuesday. The city just had its first weekend without a single shooting in at least 25 years. Theo Wargo/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Theo Wargo/Getty Images

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo meets Tuesday with Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in the capital Riyadh. They discussed the disappearance of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, who vanished two weeks ago during a visit to the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey. Leah Mills/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Leah Mills/AP

Once A Regional Stabilizer, Saudi Arabia Becomes A Disrupter

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/657905018/657923278" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Demonstrators hold signs as Democratic leaders speak with reporters outside the U.S. Capitol June 26, 2018, in Washington, D.C. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Midterm Election Could Reshape Health Policy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/651181932/657969886" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio speaks in 2017. The mayor signed a provision into a law on Tuesday that allows people born in New York City who do not identify as male or female to change their birth certificate sex to a third-category of X. Gary Gershoff/Getty Images for Housing Works hide caption

toggle caption
Gary Gershoff/Getty Images for Housing Works

USA Gymnastics hired Mary Bono as interim president and chief executive officer on Friday. But after intense criticism from many of the sport's biggest stars, Bono tendered her resignation on Tuesday. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Cliff Owen/AP