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Vice President Pence addressed the Knesset, Israel's parliament, in Jerusalem on Monday. He said a new U.S. Embassy would open in the city by the end of next year. Ariel Schalit/Pool/Reuters hide caption

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Ariel Schalit/Pool/Reuters

John Vensel is a contract attorney at the Orrick law firm in Wheeling, W.Va. He says contract work is today's economic reality. Yuki Noguchi/NPR hide caption

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Yuki Noguchi/NPR

Freelanced: The Rise Of The Contract Workforce

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Vice President Pence (left) shakes hands with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during their meeting at the prime minister's office in Jerusalem on Monday. The visit, initially scheduled for December before being postponed, is the final leg of a trip that has included talks in Egypt and Jordan as well as a stop at a U.S. military facility near the Syrian border. Ariel Schalit/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ariel Schalit/AFP/Getty Images

Larry Nassar appears in court last Wednesday in Lansing, Mich., to listen to victim impact statements during his sentencing hearing. He is accused of molesting more than 100 girls while he was a physician for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Dylan O'Riordan, 19, has been detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement for four months and is scheduled to be put on a plane to Dublin later this week. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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Undocumented Irish Caught In Trump's Immigration Dragnet

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At the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, NPR's Nina Totenberg talks to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. On stage with them is Robert Redford, founder of the festival. John Nowak / CNN Films hide caption

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John Nowak / CNN Films

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Reflects On The #MeToo Movement: 'It's About Time'

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South Korean protesters burn a portrait of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in front of Seoul Station on Monday. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

In South Korea, A Backlash Against Olympics Cooperation With The North

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Mohamed Yonus (dark shirt, green skirt) carries his distribution bag to his home in the Hakimpara refugee camp. Allison Joyce for NPR hide caption

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Allison Joyce for NPR

The Refugees Who Don't Want To Go Home ... Yet

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Current and former FBI officials worry damage to the Bureau's reputation might make witnesses or others hesitate when dealing with special agents in the field. Yuri Gripas/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Gripas/AFP/Getty Images

'Criminal Cabal'? FBI Fears Political Attacks May Imperil Work Of Field Agents

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Jenn Liv for NPR

Personalized Diets: Can Your Genes Really Tell You What To Eat?

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Catalan separatist leader Carles Puigdemont arrives at Copenhagen Airport in Denmark on Monday, Jan. 22, 2018. On the same day, his name was put forth to return as Catalonia's president. Scanpix Denmark/Reuters hide caption

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Scanpix Denmark/Reuters

Glenn Simpson, former Wall Street Journal journalist and co-founder of the research firm Fusion GPS, during his arrival for a scheduled appearance before a closed House Intelligence Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on Nov. 14, 2017. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

As mother and daughter, Carmen and Gisele Grayson thought their DNA ancestry tests would be very similar. Boy were they surprised. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

My Grandmother Was Italian. Why Aren't My Genes Italian?

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Diane Askwyth leads cheers as protestors make their way to Sam Boyd Stadium for the Women's March "Power to the Polls" voter registration tour launch on January 21, 2018, in Las Vegas, Nevada. Sam Morris/Getty Images hide caption

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Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., speaks during a news conference on Saturday, arguing that the shutdown is mainly President Trump's fault. Republicans say Democrats manufactured the crisis over immigration. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Rep. Patrick Meehan R-Pa., speaks during a news conference in 2012. A report Saturday said he used taxpayer money to settle a harassment complaint. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Then-presidential candidate Donald Trump (C) and his family prepare to cut the ribbon at the new Trump International Hotel on October 26, 2016, in Washington, D.C. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

After A Year In Office, Trump Still Facing Constitutional Challenges Over Businesses

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