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In combo of undated selfie images provided courtesy of the Dime Doe family, show Dime Doe, a Black transgender woman. Courtesy Dime Doe Family via AP hide caption

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Courtesy Dime Doe Family via AP

In this image from video provided by NASA, Steve Altemus, CEO and co-founder of Intuitive Machines, describes how it is believed the company's Odysseus spacecraft landed on the surface of the moon, during a news conference in Houston on Friday, Feb. 23, 2024. NASA via AP hide caption

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NASA via AP

Letitia James promised to "take on" then-President Donald Trump when she ran for New York attorney general in 2018. In the years since, she has sued Trump repeatedly, sparking controversy and winning major victories in court. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

N.Y.'s crusading attorney general wins again with NRA verdict, Trump judgment

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President Biden shakes hands with Utah Gov. Spencer Cox during a meeting with governors from across the country at the White House on Feb. 23. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Republican presidential hopeful and former U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley speaks during a campaign stop in Georgetown, S.C., on Thursday, ahead of the state's GOP primary on Saturday. Julia Nikhinson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Julia Nikhinson/AFP via Getty Images

Israeli soldiers sit on an artillery unit near the Israeli border with the Gaza Strip, in Netivot, Israel, Oct. 22. Amir Levy/Getty Images hide caption

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Amir Levy/Getty Images

Russia's President Vladimir Putin gives an interview to Tucker Carlson at the Kremlin in Moscow. Gavril Grigorov/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Gavril Grigorov/AFP via Getty Images

An illustration of the blastocyst stage of embryo development at about five to nine days after fertilization. The outer layer will grow to form the placenta. The inner cells will become the fetus. Juan Gaertner/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Juan Gaertner/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

The science of IVF: What to know about Alabama's 'extrauterine children' ruling

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Houthi fighters march during a rally of support for Palestinians in the Gaza Strip and against the U.S. strikes on Yemen, outside Sanaa, on Jan. 22. AP hide caption

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AP

China is mostly quiet on Houthi attacks in the Red Sea

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At a one-day workshop run by the Care School for Men in Bogotá, Colombia, male medical students at Sanitas University learn how to cradle a baby. This class of participants consists of medical students, but the usual enrollees are dads of all types. Ben de la Cruz/NPR hide caption

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Ben de la Cruz/NPR

Frozen embryos and sperm are stored in liquid nitrogen at a fertility clinic in Florida. The Alabama Supreme Court ruling stems from wrongful death cases brought by three couples who had frozen embryos destroyed in an accident at a fertility clinic in the state. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Alabama lawmakers move to protect IVF; massive leak reveals Chinese hacking operations

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Russian President Vladimir Putin and Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu (right) take part in a wreath-laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Alexander Garden on Defender of the Fatherland Day, in Moscow, Friday. Sergey Guneev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo/AP hide caption

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Sergey Guneev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo/AP

Biden announces over 500 new sanctions for Russia's war in Ukraine and Navalny death

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House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn (D-S.C.) speaks on Medicare expansion and the reconciliation package during a news conference with fellow lawmakers at the U.S. Capitol on Sept. 23, 2021, in Washington, D.C. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Rep. Jim Clyburn on the future of the Democratic Party and his legacy

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A supporter of former President Donald Trump drives past campaign signs for Republican presidential candidate Nikki Haley in Irmo, South Carolina. The state's Republican presidential primary is on Feb. 24. SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

A case of bronchitis in 2014 left Sanna Stella, a therapist who lives in the Chicago area, with debilitating fatigue. Stacey Wescott/Tribune News Service via Getty Images hide caption

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Stacey Wescott/Tribune News Service via Getty Images

Clues to a better understanding of chronic fatigue syndrome emerge from a major study

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