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Former Google AI Research Scientist Timnit Gebru speaks here in September 2018. Gebru says she was abruptly fired from the tech giant after a dispute involving a research paper. Kimberly White/Getty Images for TechCrunch hide caption

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Kimberly White/Getty Images for TechCrunch

A waitress in South Philadelphia watches a television briefing by Pennsylvania's health secretary, Dr. Rachel Levine, on Nov. 17. Levine says a COVID-19 vaccine is "the light at the end of the tunnel," but says it will be months before it's available to the general public. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

'There's No Quick Fix For COVID-19,' Cautions Pennsylvania Secretary Of Health

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Federal lawmakers introduced an joint resolution that seeks "to prohibit the use of slavery and involuntary servitude as a punishment for a crime" under the 13th Amendment to the Constitution. bonniej/Getty Images hide caption

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The U.K. has approved use of the COVID-19 vaccine developed by Pfizer and BioNTech. Dogukan Keskinkilic/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Dogukan Keskinkilic/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The thumbs-up Like logo on a sign at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. The Justice Dept. is suing the company for allegedly discriminating against U.S. workers in favor of temporary visa holders. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

A minimum three-week stay-at-home order is expected in much of California as hospitals experience an unprecedented surge in COVID-19 patients in intensive care units. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Kyle Rittenhouse is accused of killing two protesters days after Jacob Blake was shot by police in Kenosha, Wis. A judge ruled there is enough probable cause in his case to proceed to trial. Courtesy Antioch Police Department /AP hide caption

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Courtesy Antioch Police Department /AP

People getting the COVID-19 vaccine will receive a special vaccine card to record their doses, Operation Warp Speed officials say. Here, a Department of Health and Human Services employee holds a sample card. EJ Hersom/Defense.gov hide caption

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EJ Hersom/Defense.gov

President Trump listens during a ceremony Thursday to present the Presidential Medal of Freedom to former college football coach Lou Holtz in the Oval Office. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

In His Final Weeks, Trump Could Dole Out Many Pardons To Friends, Allies

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As governments around the world prepare to approve the first coronavirus vaccines, social media companies are cracking down on hoaxes and conspiracy theories. Ashley Landis/AP hide caption

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Ashley Landis/AP

Chinese President Xi Jinping, center, also general secretary of the Chinese Communist Party, leads the fifth plenary session of the party's 19th Central Committee in October in Beijing. The U.S. State Department on Thursday tightened travel restrictions on members of the party and their families. Liu Bin/Xinhua News Agency via AP hide caption

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Liu Bin/Xinhua News Agency via AP

Brian Deese, seen here speaking to White House reporters in 2015, is President-elect Joe Biden's pick to lead the National Economic Council. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP