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This satellite image taken by Maxar Technologies shows the Belize-flagged ship Rubymar in the Red Sea on Friday. The Rubymar, earlier attacked by Yemen's Houthi rebels, has sunk after days of taking on water, officials said Saturday. Maxar Technologies via AP hide caption

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Maxar Technologies via AP

Palestinians holding foreign passports collect their luggage as they prepare to cross to Egypt from the Gaza Strip through the Rafah border crossing on Feb. 6. Abed Rahim Khatib/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Abed Rahim Khatib/dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images

What does it take to flee Gaza? Thousands of dollars, paid to an Egyptian broker

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President Biden greets people at CJ's Cafe in Los Angeles, Calif., on Feb. 21, 2024. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

What Biden's been eating on the trail and what it says about his campaign

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Former President Donald Trump, aide Nauta and Mar-a-Lago property manager Carlos de Oliveira face some 40 criminal counts over classified documents found at Trump's Florida residence and club. Jon Elswick/AP hide caption

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Jon Elswick/AP

Trump's trial over classified documents in Florida could start as soon as this summer

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Conde Nast strike and Aaron Bushnell protest sign. ANGELA WEISS/AFP; Jacek Boczarski/Anadolu/Getty Images hide caption

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ANGELA WEISS/AFP; Jacek Boczarski/Anadolu/Getty Images

Three ways to think about journalism layoffs; plus, Aaron Bushnell's self-immolation

The American journalism industry is in crisis - layoffs, strikes, and site shutdowns have some people talking about the potential extinction of the the news industry as we know it. Just last week, VICE Media announced their plans to layoff hundreds of employees and halt website operations. Taylor Lorenz, the Washington Post online culture and technology columnist, joins the show to unpack what is at stake with the continued media closures and layoffs.

Three ways to think about journalism layoffs; plus, Aaron Bushnell's self-immolation

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Louisville's statue of French King Louis XVI was removed after it was vandalized during protests in 2020. The 200 year-old monument was a gift from Louisville's sister city of Montpellier, France. Stephanie Wolf/Louisville Public Media hide caption

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Stephanie Wolf/Louisville Public Media

This building in Rafah, in southern Gaza, was destroyed by Israeli bombardment in December. amid continuing battles between Israel and Hamas. Mahmud Hams/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mahmud Hams/AFP via Getty Images

Jordanian air force personnel inside a C-130 aircraft after airdropping pallets of aid over Gaza on Thursday. Moises Saman for NPR hide caption

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Moises Saman for NPR

Aboard Jordan's aid airdrop over Gaza, a last resort for relief to Palestinians there

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The CDC has overhauled its COVID-19 isolation guidelines, saying the virus no longer represents the same threat to public health as it did several years ago. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AP

Oprah Winfrey, pictured in January, said she will donate her stake in WeightWatchers and proceeds from any future stock options to the National Museum of African American History and Culture upon her departure from the company's board of directors. Chris Pizzello/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/AP

From left, Elon Musk, Sam Altman and Andrew Ross Sorkin, New York Times financial columnist, speak during the Vanity Fair New Establishment Summit at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts on Oct. 6, 2015, in San Francisco. Mike Windle/Getty Images for Vanity Fair hide caption

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Mike Windle/Getty Images for Vanity Fair

A prescription is filled on Jan. 6, 2023, in Morganton, N.C. A ransomware attack is disrupting pharmacies and hospitals nationwide this week. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

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Chris Carlson/AP

Does climate change exist? And does a character know it? The Oscar-nominated films Nyad, left, Mission: Impossible — Dead Reckoning Part One and Barbie met the criteria for a new challenge inspired by the famous Bechdel Test. Liz Parkinson/Netflix; Christian Black/Paramount Pictures and Skydance; Warner Bros. Pictures hide caption

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Liz Parkinson/Netflix; Christian Black/Paramount Pictures and Skydance; Warner Bros. Pictures

There's a new 'Climate Reality Check' test — these 3 Oscar-nominated features passed

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Alyssa Milano says that celebrity activism is at its best "when we are able to hand over the microphone" to the "incredible heroes" doing activism work day to day. She's pictured above in July 2018 at a protest following President Trump's meetings with Russia's Vladimir Putin. A longtime activist, Milano says it's impossible to avoid "the vitriol," especially when talking about the Middle East. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

When celebrities show up to protest, the media follows — but so does the backlash

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