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Hundreds of students gather at the State Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., on Friday to protest gun violence, part of a national high school walkout on the 19th anniversary of the Columbine High School shooting. Jim Mone/AP hide caption

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Jim Mone/AP

A New Generation's Political Awakening

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In a study of nearly 5,600 U.S. youths ages 12 to 17, about 6 percent say they've engaged in some sort of digital self-harm. More than half in that subgroup say they've bullied themselves this way more than once. Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images

Two roommates in the 1950s study in their shared Duke University dormitory. Duke University Archives hide caption

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Duke University Archives

Why Duke University Won't Honor Freshman Roommate Requests This Fall

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Didier Kassai uses comics to "transmit a message." His father opposed to a career in art until Kassai began earning money for his drawings. Here he sits in his office in Bangui, capital of the Central African Republic. Cassandra Vinograd for NPR hide caption

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Cassandra Vinograd for NPR

Truck driver James Matthew Bradley Jr. was sentenced to life in prison without parole on Friday. Officers found 39 immigrants inside a vehicle that he was driving in July 2017. Ten of the passengers died. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens is seen earlier this month discussing a 2015 extramarital affair. He faces a felony charge of invasion of privacy related to the affair and another of computer tampering. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Columbine High School teacher Paula Reed is overcome with grief after signing Rachel Scott's casket during funeral services on April 24, 1999. Rick Wilking/Reuters hide caption

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Rick Wilking/Reuters

April Is A Cruel Month For This Columbine Teacher And Survivor

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Britain's Conservative Party politician Enoch Powell, right, listens to two demonstrators in Canada in April 1968, reading a petition that describes him as a "racist." AP hide caption

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AP

An Anti-Immigration Speech Divided Britain 50 Years Ago. It Still Echoes Today

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A NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image of the Lagoon Nebula, which is about 4,000 light-years away. It was taken by Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3 in February. The image was released to celebrate the 28th anniversary of Hubble. NASA, ESA, STScI hide caption

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NASA, ESA, STScI

In the fall of 2017, left, Stream Tracker volunteer John Hammond found this creek near Fort Collins, Colo., to be dry. A year later, it was flowing again. Kira Puntenney-Desmond/Colorado State University hide caption

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Kira Puntenney-Desmond/Colorado State University

How Pokemon Inspired A Citizen Science Project To Monitor Tiny Streams

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National Park Service wildland firefighters set a prescribed fire in Manassas National Battlefield Park's Brawner Farm area to help the area look more like Civil War soldiers would have seen it. Brian Gorsia/NPS hide caption

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Brian Gorsia/NPS

Gina Haspel, an undercover CIA officer for three decades, has been nominated to become director of the spy agency. Several senators say they will be asking tough questions about her role in the CIA's waterboarding program that began after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks. CIA via AP hide caption

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CIA via AP

The CIA Introduces Gina Haspel After Her Long Career Undercover

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Women march in the 2016 traditional Reed Dance at the royal palace in Lobamba. On Thursday, in celebration of the country's 50th year of independence, King Mswati III declared that he was changing the name of Swaziland to eSwatini. Mujahid Safodien/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mujahid Safodien/AFP/Getty Images

Catherine Fitzgerald, the author's mother, spent four nights in a hospital after falling in her home. But Medicare refused to pay for her rehab care, saying she had only been an inpatient for one night. Alison Kodjak/NPR hide caption

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Alison Kodjak/NPR

Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez and party leaders say they're suing Russia, WikiLeaks and the Trump campaign for an alleged conspiracy targeting the 2016 presidential campaign. Branden Camp/AP hide caption

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Branden Camp/AP