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Karla Monterroso says after going to Alameda Hospital in May with a very accelerated heart rate, very low blood pressure and cycling oxygen levels, her entire experience was one of being punished for being 'insubordinate.' Kenneth Eke/Code2040 hide caption

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Steve Wynn speaks to reporters in Massachusetts in 2016, when he still led Wynn Resorts. In 2018, Wynn stepped down from the company after a series of allegations of sexual misconduct, including one allegation of rape. Wynn has denied any wrongdoing. Jessica Rinaldi/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Rinaldi/Boston Globe via Getty Images

David Xol of Guatemala hugs his son Byron as they were reunited at Los Angeles International Airport in January. The father and son were separated 18 months earlier under the Trump administration's "no tolerance" migration policy. Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP hide caption

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National Transportation Safety Board member Jennifer Homendy (right) walks with other NTSB officials past a makeshift memorial for victims of the Conception boat fire in September 2019 in Santa Barbara, Calif. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Hatice Cengiz says her accusations against Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman over the murder of Jamal Khashoggi would not receive a fair trial in Saudi Arabia. She is seen here earlier this month at the 16th Zurich Film Festival in Switzerland. Valeriano Di Domenico/Getty Images for ZFF hide caption

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Valeriano Di Domenico/Getty Images for ZFF

Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, is pictured on Sept. 9 on Capitol Hill. Collins says a vaccine would not be approved for emergency use before late November at the earliest. Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Nash/Pool/Getty Images

NIH Director 'Guardedly Optimistic' About COVID-19 Vaccine Approval By End Of 2020

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Joyce Chen, an associate professor of development economics at Ohio State University, has had to put her research on hold this year to oversee her children's virtual schooling. Chen is also teaching virtually this fall. Jessica Phelps for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Phelps for NPR

Even The Most Successful Women Pay A Big Price In Pandemic

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Hawaiian Airlines jets outside Daniel K. Inouye International Airport in Honolulu. Hawaii has seen a more than 90% reduction in the number of air travelers arriving since the start of the pandemic. Ryan Finnerty/Hawaii Public Radio hide caption

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Ryan Finnerty/Hawaii Public Radio

Facing Economic Devastation, Hawaii Attempts To Revive Tourism

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The Tampa Bay Rays practice at Globe Life Field with the roof open as the team prepares for Tuesday's World Series opener against the Los Angeles Dodgers, in Arlington, Texas. First pitch for Game 1 is at 8:09 p.m. ET. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Game On! The World Series Begins Between The L.A. Dodgers And Tampa Bay Rays

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Claude Mabowa, 21years-old, an Ebola virus survivor and student, sits inside what used to be his sisters bedroom in Beni, north eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo on September 17, 2019. He lost four family members to Ebola and whilst recovering inside the Ebola Treatment Centre he managed to take and pass his final school exams. John Wessels/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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John Wessels/AFP via Getty Images

A photo taken in July shows what's left of the Jeffrey asbestos mine in Asbestos, Quebec. The town has voted to change its name to Val-des-Sources. Eric Thomas/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Shoppers buy face masks on O'Connell Street in Dublin, Ireland, on Tuesday. Ireland's government is putting the country at its highest level of coronavirus restrictions for six weeks in a bid to combat a rise in infections. Niall Carson/AP hide caption

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A police marksman and his dog observes convicted killer Peter Madsen threatening police with detonating a bomb while attempting to break out of jail Tuesday in Albertslund, Denmark. Nils Meilvang/Ritzau Scanpix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Rush Limbaugh says he intends to keep putting on his radio show despite his stage 4 lung cancer that he says has recently progressed. Here, he's seen reacting as first lady Melania Trump gives him the Presidential Medal of Freedom during the State of the Union address in February. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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The U.S. Justice Department is suing Google, accusing the tech giant of breaking antitrust laws as it has amassed power and grown into the world's most dominant search engine. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Google Abuses Its Monopoly Power Over Search, Justice Department Says In Lawsuit

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Kyle Larson, shown here during a practice at Daytona International Speedway in February, has been reinstated by NASCAR after he was suspended in April. Icon Sportswire via Getty Images hide caption

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Icon Sportswire via Getty Images