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Three potential coronavirus vaccines are kept in a tray at Novavax labs in Gaithersburg, Md., in March 2020. The company has moved into phase 3 trials in the U.K. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Novavax Researcher Says No Chance Of A 'Shortcut' In Vaccine Safety

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The Bench draped for the death of Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the Supreme Court in Washington. Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020. Fred Schilling/AP hide caption

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Fred Schilling/AP

Supreme Court Misconceptions

When the biggest news stories happen all at once, it's easy to miss what each of them really means. Since Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death last week, there have been questions about who will replace her and what it means for the court. Sam talks to Slate's Mark Joseph Stern about the Supreme Court's history and what recent discussions get wrong. Then, Democrats and progressives brought in massive fundraising dollars in the days after Justice Ginsburg's death. Sam chats with Julie Bykowicz of the Wall Street Journal about what all that money means. Finally, Sam talks to Tina Vasquez of Prism about the forced sterilization of immigrants in a Georgia detention center, and why it's important to see the bigger picture.

Supreme Court Misconceptions

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The Tongass National Forest, near Ketchikan, Alaska. The Trump Administration is set to remove long-standing protections against logging and development in the forest. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

The Space Force has touted its fielding of the first ever all-female space operations crew as a sign that it is living up to ideals of diversity and inclusion. The crew gained satellite control acceptance of GPS satellite SVN-76 in July 2020. Dennis Rogers and Kathryn Calvert/U.S. Air Force hide caption

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Dennis Rogers and Kathryn Calvert/U.S. Air Force

The Air Force Struggles With Diversity. Can The Space Force Do Any Better?

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An American flag flew at half-mast at the Holyoke Soldiers' Home in Massachusetts last spring, when dozens of veterans died at the facility. Two of its leaders are now facing criminal neglect charges over their handling of a COVID-19 outbreak. Matthew Cavanaugh/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Cavanaugh/Getty Images

Morgan Cooper holds newborn Lourice as her husband Saleh Totah and 4-year-old son look on. Lourice was delivered in June in a home birth in an inflatable swimming pool in the family's home in the West Bank city of Ramallah. They planned to travel to the U.S. but faced bureaucratic obstacles. Tanya Habjouqa/NOOR hide caption

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Tanya Habjouqa/NOOR

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, here during a news conference last month, says his state is ready to respond if a surge of coronavirus infections emerges. Chris O'Meara/AP hide caption

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Chris O'Meara/AP

Shamsia Alizada, left school in 2018 after an ISIS suicide bomber struck the academy in Kabul where she was studying. Now she's scored the highest grades on Afghanistan's nation-wide university entrance exams at a time when negotiations with the Taliban threaten the rights of women in the country. Twitter/ Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Twitter/ Screenshot by NPR

Interim Seattle Police Chief Adrian Diaz addresses a news conference about changes being made at the department, earlier this month. The SPD announced Thursday that an officer seen on video rolling his bicycle over a downed protester was suspended pending an investigation. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Magawa, a rat that has been trained to detect explosives, was awarded the PDSA Gold Medal on Friday for bravery in searching out unexploded land mines in Cambodia. PDSA via AP hide caption

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PDSA via AP

Sir David Attenborough, shown here during a ceremony last September, broke the world record on Thursday for the fastest time to reach one million followers on Instagram. Asadour Guzelian /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Asadour Guzelian /AFP via Getty Images