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Voters cast their ballots in Sutton, New Hampshire on Nov. 8, 2016. State officials say the state's old-school paper ballots mean its election systems are more secure than in other states. Ryan McBride/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ryan McBride/AFP via Getty Images

A motorbike convoy in November follows the last ride of Harry Dunn, who died when his motorbike was involved in a head-on collision in August 2019, near RAF Croughton, in Brackley, England. Andrew Matthews/AP hide caption

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Andrew Matthews/AP

A man holding an umbrella walks past excavators at the construction site where a new quarantine and treatment center is being built to treat patients of a new coronavirus. Stringer ./Reuters hide caption

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Stringer ./Reuters

A militia member checks the body temperature of a driver at an expressway toll gate in Wuhan, China. Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Wuhan Coronavirus 101: What We Do — And Don't — Know About A Newly Identified Disease

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Insys Therapeutics founder John Kapoor was convicted in a bribery and kickback scheme that prosecutors said helped fuel the opioid crisis. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Pharmaceutical Executive John Kapoor Sentenced To 66 Months In Prison In Opioid Trial

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In this pool photo of a Pentagon-approved sketch by court artist Janet Hamlin, defendant Ali Abdul Aziz Ali, also known as Ammar al-Baluchi, attends his pretrial hearing along with other Sept. 11 defendants at Naval Station Guantanamo Bay in 2014. Janet Hamlin, Pool/AP hide caption

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Janet Hamlin, Pool/AP

The Hankou Railway Station in Wuhan, China, was closed as part of a shutdown of public transportation — an effort to control the spread of what's being called the Wuhan coronavirus. Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Barcroft Media via Getty Images

China Halts Transportation Out Of Wuhan To Contain Coronavirus. Could It Backfire?

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In this artist sketch, Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., flanked by Sen. Ben Cardin, D-Md., left, and Sen. Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis., right, listens during the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump. Several Senators report that the trial's strict rules and long hours make are testing their mental fortitude. Dana Verkouteren/AP hide caption

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Dana Verkouteren/AP

Sandra Joyce, the head of global intelligence at the cybersecurity firm FireEye, speaks at the company's Cyber Defense Summit in 2018. Private tech companies are increasingly taking the lead in reporting information about suspected attacks by foreign actors. In some cases, the companies sell their reports to the U.S. intelligence community. Courtesy of FireEye hide caption

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Courtesy of FireEye

Tech Companies Take A Leading Role In Warning Of Foreign Cyber Threats

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The phone of Jeff Bezos allegedly was hacked via a WhatsApp account held by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. Bandar Algaloud/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Bandar Algaloud/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Visiting the U.S. to have a baby — and secure a U.S. passport for the child — is not "a legitimate activity for pleasure or of a recreational nature," the State Department says. Benny Snyder/AP hide caption

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Benny Snyder/AP

Actress Annabella Sciorra described in detail the alleged assault by Harvey Weinstein during his trial on Thursday. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Actress Annabella Sciorra Testifies That Harvey Weinstein Raped Her

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The Doomsday Clock reads 100 seconds to midnight, a decision made by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists that was announced Thursday. The clock is intended to represent the danger of global catastrophe. Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eva Hambach/AFP via Getty Images