News: U.S. and World News Headlines NPR news, audio, and podcasts. Coverage of breaking stories, national and world news, politics, business, science, technology, and extended coverage of major national and world events.

News

Lead House Manager Adam Schiff speaks to the press at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday ahead of the second day of President Trump's impeachment trial. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Terry Jones performs the famous "Spam" sketch during 2014's Monty Python Live (Mostly) stage show. Jones died at the age of 77 after suffering from dementia. Dave J Hogan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Dave J Hogan/Getty Images

Randi Weingarten, of the American Federation of Teachers, says the message of her organization's lawsuit is clear: "Protect the students of the United States of America — not the for-profit [schools] that are making a buck off of them." Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc via Getty Images

The phone of Jeff Bezos, Amazon CEO and owner of The Washington Post, reportedly was hacked via a WhatsApp account owned by Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Cliff Owen/AP

A pro-choice activist holds a sign as Sen. Cory Booker, a Democrat from New Jersey, speaks during a rally in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in May. A recent Gallup poll found that more Americans want less strict abortion laws. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Hospital staff wash the emergency entrance of Wuhan Medical Treatment Center, where patients infected with a new virus are being treated, in Wuhan, China, on Wednesday. Dake Kang/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Dake Kang/AP

Intelligence Community Threats Executive Shelby Pierson told NPR that more nations may attempt more types of interference in the United States. "This isn't a Russia-only problem," she says. Kisha Ravi/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kisha Ravi/NPR

Election Security Boss: Threats To 2020 Are Now Broader, More Diverse

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/798186093/798392260" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Many Americans who get overwhelmed by student loan debt are told that student debt can't be erased through bankruptcy. Now more judges and lawyers say that's a myth and bankruptcy can help. Mitch Blunt/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mitch Blunt/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Myth Busted: Turns Out Bankruptcy Can Wipe Out Student Loan Debt After All

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/797330613/798468526" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Voters in King County, Wash., will have the opportunity to vote on their smartphones in February. It will be the first election in U.S. history in which all eligible voters will be able to vote using their personal devices. Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chris Delmas/AFP via Getty Images

Exclusive: Seattle-Area Voters To Vote By Smartphone In 1st For U.S. Elections

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/798126153/798392248" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., has released a plan setting up a swift impeachment trial for President Trump. Democrats objected to some key elements. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Julio Cortez/AP

Kendra Espinoza, the lead plaintiff in the case, has two daughters attending Stillwater Christian School in Kalispell, Mont. She is an office manager and staff accountant who works extra jobs to pay for her children's tuition. Christopher Duperron/Institute for Justice hide caption

toggle caption
Christopher Duperron/Institute for Justice

Supreme Court Considers Religious Schools Case

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/798128487/798392242" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Some people land in the hospital over and over. Although research suggests that giving those patients extra follow-up care from nurses and social workers won't reduce those extra hospital visits, some hospitals say the approach still saves them money in the long run. Oivind Hovland/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Oivind Hovland/Ikon Images/Getty Images
Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

Some Push To Change State Laws That Require HIV Disclosure To Sexual Partners

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/797359483/797363862" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

The now-former Recording Academy president and CEO, Deborah Dugan, speaking in Nov. at the Grammy nomination press conference in New York City. Bryan Bedder/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bryan Bedder/Getty Images

Drinking fountains are marked "Do Not Drink Until Further Notice" at Flint Northwestern High School in Flint, Mich., in May 2016. After 18 months of insisting that water drawn from the Flint River was safe to drink, officials admitted it was not. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Carolyn Kaster/AP