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A police officer guards the road in front of a house where police found the bodies of the suspected gunman and his mother, in Hanau, Germany, on Thursday. Michael Probst/AP hide caption

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Michael Probst/AP

Shootings In Germany Kill 10; Police Suspect Far-Right Extremism

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U.S. Ambassador to Germany Richard Grenell speaks during a news conference after a meeting with Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic in Belgrade, Serbia, last month. Darko Vojinovic/AP hide caption

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Darko Vojinovic/AP

A girl in a park in Beijing on Feb. 15. Researchers are looking at the impact of the newly identified coronavirus on children. Wang Zhao /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Wang Zhao /AFP via Getty Images

Coronavirus Is Contagious, But Kids Seem Less Vulnerable So Far

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When filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in September, Forever 21 had stated that it planned to reorganize the business and would likely close up to 178 U.S. stores. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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Kiichiro Sato/AP

Workers in Pyongyang produce masks for protection against the new coronavirus. Experts say North Korea's track record of fighting epidemics does not bode well for its handling of the coronavirus outbreak. Kim Won-Jin/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kim Won-Jin/AFP via Getty Images

North Korea Claims Zero Coronavirus Cases, But Experts Are Skeptical

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Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed (right) receives the crown from the man who found it, Sirak Asfaw, during a ceremony Thursday in Addis Ababa. The 18th-century Ethiopian crown had been hidden in a Dutch apartment for the past 21 years. The Office of Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed via AP hide caption

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The Office of Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed via AP

During a visit last week to the California Museum in Sacramento, Les Ouchida holds a 1943 photo of himself (front row center) and his siblings taken at the internment camp in Jerome, Ark., that his family was moved to from their home near Sacramento in 1942. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Australians Clare Hedger and her mother are now free from a two-week quarantine on the Diamond Princess cruise ship in Yokohama, Japan. Health officials in Japan are being sharply criticized for their handling of the coronavirus quarantine on the ship. Clare Hedger/via Reuters hide caption

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Clare Hedger/via Reuters

Arthur Jackson watches as visiting nurse Brenda Mastricola changes the bandages on his foot. He needs a continuous dose of IV penicillin to treat a serious bone infection, and doctors decided he could safely get the treatment at home, despite his history of opioid addiction. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Calvin Brandford (center) is a certified minority contractor who has run an excavation business north of Boston for almost 30 years. Brandford said getting state-funded work as a subcontractor is very hard and often comes with a serious drawback: not getting paid for 60 to 90 days. Chris Burrell/WGBH hide caption

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Chris Burrell/WGBH

Disparities In Government Contracting Hurt Minority-Owned Businesses

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Lisa Ricchio sued the motel where she was sexually assaulted and held captive under the Trafficking Victims Protection Act. Todd Bookman/New Hampshire Public Radio hide caption

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Todd Bookman/New Hampshire Public Radio

Human Trafficking Survivor Settles Lawsuit Against Motel Where She Was Held Captive

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