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A Seattle barbershop remains closed because of the coronavirus outbreak on May 19. Last week, an additional 2.1 million people filed for unemployment benefits around the country. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

The Statue of Liberty is seen behind refrigeration trucks that function as temporary morgues at New York City's South Brooklyn Marine Terminal. "If you're driving by ... you might just assume that this was some sort of distribution hub," Time reporter W.J. Hennigan says. "But they are each filled with up to 90 bodies apiece. Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

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Noam Galai/Getty Images

A woman leads a group of protesters in chants outside a police precinct on Wednesday in Minneapolis. The death of George Floyd, after video surfaced of an officer kneeling on his neck, has prompted protests nationwide. Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

The late Kobe Bryant headlines the star-studded Basketball Hall of Fame Class of 2020. The event is postponed to 2021. Bryant is pictured speaking to the media prior to a game against the Cleveland Cavaliers in February 2016. Nick Cammett/Diamond Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Nick Cammett/Diamond Images/Getty Images

The Trump administration issued tough export rules this month, which analysts say could spell a death knell for Huawei's worldwide mobile network ambitions. Wang Zhao/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Wang Zhao/AFP via Getty Images

Hoping to draw tourists to Cyprus this summer, officials cite the "open-air lifestyle, abundance of personal space" and clean air. Here, rows of beach umbrellas await visitors on a nearly empty stretch of Nissi beach at the seaside resort of Ayia Napa earlier this month. Petros Karadjias/AP hide caption

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Petros Karadjias/AP

A 2019 naturalization ceremony in Lowell, Mass. The pandemic has put such ceremonies on hold in an election year when many new citizens vote for the first time. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

In this photo illustration, a person looks at an abortion pill (RU-486) for unintended pregnancy from Mifepristone displayed on a smartphone on May 8, 2020, in Arlington, Va. Under federal law, even in states where telemedicine abortion is legal, there are strict rules surrounding how the pill is dispensed. Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump and Chinese Vice Premier Liu He signed a preliminary trade agreement at the White House on Jan. 15. Since then, tensions between the two countries have grown. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

U.S.-China Tensions Were Already High. Pandemic And Hong Kong Have Made Things Worse

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Cory Obenour, chef and co-owner of the Blue Plate restaurant in San Francisco, prepares takeout and delivery orders. The restaurant received funds from the Paycheck Protection Program, according to The Associated Press. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Registered nurses and other health care workers at UCLA Medical Center in Santa Monica, Calif., protest in April what they say was a lack of personal protective equipment for the pandemic's front-line workers. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

A driver picks up a package while making deliveries for Amazon in Costa Mesa, Calif., on March 23. Amazon is offering to permanent jobs for 125,000 workers it hired to deal with a sharp rise in online shopping during the coronavirus pandemic. Alex Gallardo/Reuters hide caption

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Alex Gallardo/Reuters

Because of the pandemic, the Bureau of Land Management held virtual public hearings in April on a proposal to expand oil drilling in Alaska's North Slope. U.S. Department of the Interior / screenshot by NPR hide caption

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U.S. Department of the Interior / screenshot by NPR

People pray inside St. Michael's Church on Tuesday in Brooklyn. Stephanie Keith/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

Medical personnel test people in vehicles for COVID-19, at Annandale High School, in Annandale, Va., on May 23. There's a new bottleneck emerging in coronavirus testing: A shortage of the machines that process the tests and give results. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Coronavirus Testing Machines Are Latest Bottleneck In Troubled Supply Chain

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