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Millions of Texans lost power when the winter storm hit the state and knocked out coal, natural gas and nuclear plants that were unprepared for the freezing temperatures. Brazos Electric Power Cooperative Inc. filed for Chapter 11 in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court citing a massive, multi-billion bill from the Electric Reliability Council of Texas. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

More than 5,800 warehouse workers at the Bessemer, Ala., Amazon facility are voting this month on whether to join the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union. Supporters are protesting in solidarity with those workers. Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

The disinformation and "big lie" of election fraud motivated many people to storm the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. Matt Williams for NPR hide caption

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Matt Williams for NPR

Shipping workers recorded the tide levels beginning in 1854 at St. George's Dock in Liverpool, England, creating valuable records for future scientists. Heritage Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Heritage Images/Getty Images

How Fast Are Oceans Rising? The Answer May Be In Century-Old Shipping Logs

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Adam Baske (left) and Capt. Rob Odlin of Running Tide Technologies in the Gulf of Maine. They release rope that's entwined with early-stage kelp, a fast growing seaweed that will soak up carbon dioxide. Fred Bever/Maine Public hide caption

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Fred Bever/Maine Public

Before conducting the nasal swab test for COVID-19 at the Rantoul, Ill., clinic, researchers go out to greet each visitor and ask for basic identification and health information. Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media hide caption

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Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media

To Help Farmworkers Get COVID-19 Tests And Vaccine, Build Trust And A Safety Net

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Police gesture toward protesters as security forces crack down on demonstrations against the military coup in Yangon on Sunday. The United Nations says at least 18 protesters were killed Sunday, the deadliest day yet since the military took power earlier this month. Sai Aung Main/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sai Aung Main/AFP via Getty Images

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices voted 12-0, with one recusal, to recommend the use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine for people aged 18 and older. Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Phill Magakoe/AFP via Getty Images

Thulja Hurkchand as a young woman and with her son Hitesh. She'd tell him, "Don't worry. It's going to be okay. I'm going to be okay." Yet in the face of the pandemic, he couldn't help but worry. Family Photos hide caption

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Family Photos

A Race To Protect His Country — And His Mother

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Electrical grid transmission towers in Pasadena, Calif. Major power outages from extreme weather have risen dramatically in the past two decades. John Antczak/AP hide caption

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John Antczak/AP

It's Not Just Texas. The Entire Energy Grid Needs An Upgrade For Extreme Weather

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Former slave Felix Haywood, 92 years old when he was photographed in San Antonio in 1937, told an interviewer, "All we had to do was to walk, but walk south, and we'd be free as soon as we crossed the Rio Grande." Library of Congress hide caption

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Library of Congress

A Chapter In U.S. History Often Ignored: The Flight Of Runaway Slaves To Mexico

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Seventeen-year-old Bradley Westlock receives his second COVID-19 vaccine shot. He and other teens in Sitka, Alaska, are eligible now that higher risk populations have already received the vaccination. Katherine Rose/KCAW hide caption

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Katherine Rose/KCAW

Alaska Town Now Vaccinating Everyone 16 And Older

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