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Dr. Warren Hern's clinic in Boulder, Colo., photographed on Monday, June 1, 2009. Hern said a ballot initiative to ban abortion after 22 weeks in Colorado would prohibit about 95% of the procedures performed at the clinic. Ed Andrieski/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Ed Andrieski/ASSOCIATED PRESS

This undated selfie photo provided by Rickia Young shows her lip. Attorney Kevin Mincey, who represents Young, says she went to retrieve her 16-year-old nephew from the area were a protest was occurring, and put her 2-year-old son in the car to help him fall asleep. Rickia Young/AP hide caption

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Rickia Young/AP

New Zealanders have voted to allow assisted dying for the terminally ill but voted down legalizing marijuana. The questions were put to the country in separate referendums held in conjunction with the general election that handed Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern a landslide victory for another term. Mark Baker/AP hide caption

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Mark Baker/AP

Tony Potts, a 69-year-old retiree living in Ormond Beach, Fla., receives his first injection earlier this year as a participant in a Phase 3 clinical trial of Moderna's COVID-19 candidate vaccine. NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto via Getty Images

Advisers To CDC Debate How COVID-19 Vaccine Should Be Rolled Out

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Cruise ships are docked at the Port of Miami in the spring. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suspended cruises from U.S. ports in March after coronavirus outbreaks on a number of ships. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

The U.S. Capitol, seen here on April 13, remains closed to public tours and open only to members, staff, press and official business visitors. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

An election worker opens envelopes and removes ballots so they can be counted at the election office on Octo. 26, 2020 in Provo, Utah. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

A Long Tradition Of Mail-In Voting For Service Members, With Few Problems

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Cars line up for coronavirus tests at the University of Texas at El Paso on Oct. 23. The city has seen a surge in cases, prompting a judge to issue a shutdown of nonessential businesses. Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Ratje/AFP via Getty Images

Voting trainers prepare to instruct poll workers in preparation for early voting at Capital One Arena in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 19. Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for NPR hide caption

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Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for NPR

A health worker administers a polio vaccine to a child in Afghanistan's Kandahar province. Taliban opposition to vaccine campaigns have left millions of children unprotected against the virus. Javed Tanveer/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Javed Tanveer/AFP via Getty Images

A Connecticut prosecutor says the Kennedy cousin Michael Skakel, shown here, will not face a second trial in the 1975 murder of teenager Martha Moxley in Greenwich. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Iranian human rights lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh with a poster of South Africa's Nelson Mandela, in a scene from the Nasrin documentary. Floating World Pictures hide caption

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Floating World Pictures