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Farmers, traders and customers weave through waist-high heaps of chili peppers, piles of ginger and mounds of carrots at a government-run wholesale market in western India. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

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Joe Delagrave (c) is co-captain of the USA Wheelchair Rugby team. The squad was practicing at a recent training camp in Birmingham, Ala. at the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Training site. Lexi Branta Coon/Courtesy USA Wheelchair Rugby hide caption

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Lexi Branta Coon/Courtesy USA Wheelchair Rugby

The Tokyo Olympics Are On — For Now — As Athletes Train Through The Uncertainty

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False conspiracy theories have always been a part of U.S. history, but experts say they're spreading faster and wider than ever before. Matt Williams for NPR hide caption

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Matt Williams for NPR

'Through The Looking Glass': Conspiracy Theories Spread Faster And Wider Than Ever

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As a researcher at the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle, Alice Mukora says she understands the need to enroll diverse populations in Alzheimer's research. But that would be more likely to happen, she notes, if people of color had better experiences getting Alzheimer's care. Siri Stafford/Getty Images hide caption

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Norwegian Refugee Council Secretary-General Jan Egeland visiting displaced families in the Muhamasheen community in Amran, Yemen, on Sunday. Michelle Delaney/NRC hide caption

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Michelle Delaney/NRC

As Yemenis Starve To Death, Humanitarian Relief Group Pleas For International Help

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Students attending school in Santa Clarita, Calif., last week. California Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Monday that schools that offer in-person learning by the end of March will be eligible for a portion of funds totaling $2 billion. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Georgia voters cast their ballots in Chamblee for runoff elections in early January. Georgia's Republican lawmakers have proposed a number of changes to cut down on voting options. Virginie Kippelen/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Virginie Kippelen/AFP via Getty Images

Georgia House Passes Elections Bill That Would Limit Absentee And Early Voting

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Sexual harassment allegations made against Gov. Andrew Cuomo by two former aides will be examined by independent investigators hired by the New York state attorney general's office. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Pope Francis shakes hands with Joe Biden, then vice president, at the Vatican, in 2016. Andrew Medichini/AP hide caption

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Andrew Medichini/AP

In Pope Francis, Biden Has A Potential Ally — Who Shares The Same Catholic Detractors

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A health care worker draws a dose of Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine into a syringe for an immunization event in the parking lot of the L.A. Mission on Feb. 24. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Could A Single-Dose Of COVID-19 Vaccine After Illness Stretch The Supply?

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Palestinian elementary school students wearing protective face masks take their seats in their classroom amid the coronavirus pandemic on the first day of class in September at a United Nations-run school in the West Bank city of Ramallah. Majdi Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Majdi Mohammed/AP

Israeli Health Officials To Government: Vaccinate All Palestinians

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