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Sen. Elizabeth Warren holds a news conference in March. She and Sen. Bernie Sanders are leading the push to introduce a bill Tuesday that would make pandemic-related food benefits for college students permanent, and create grants for colleges to address hunger. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Relatives of students who attend a school in the Russian city of Kazan, where a gunman opened fire on Tuesday, killing several students and at least one teacher and injuring more than 20 others. Yegor Aleyev/Yegor Aleyev/TASS hide caption

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Yegor Aleyev/Yegor Aleyev/TASS

Some families wait years to get a housing voucher only to find out many landlords won't accept them. Beck Harlan hide caption

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Beck Harlan

Government Housing Vouchers Are Hard To Get, And Hard To Use

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The Royal Dutch Shell refinery in Norco, Louisiana. The state is a major petrochemical and oil and gas producer, but Governor John Bel Edwards has called for a plan to dramatically reduce climate warming emissions. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

John Calhoun of Flathead County has diabetes and was convinced by an old friend to get vaccinated, through he suspects the coronavirus isn't as dangerous as health officials say it is. He's hoping vaccination will ease divisions over masking. Katheryn Houghton/KHN hide caption

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Katheryn Houghton/KHN

Members of the Montana Conservation Corps (MCC) work on the trails near Tally Lake in northwestern Montana. President Biden wants to retool and relaunch one of the country's most celebrated government programs: the Civilian Conservation Corps. MCC crews are already doing some of the work envisioned in Biden's climate proposal. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Reaching Back To The New Deal, Biden Proposes A Civilian Climate Corps

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There is a group of about 150 people in federal prison known as "old law" prisoners who committed crimes before November 1987 and still have little hope of release. Cornelia Li for NPR hide caption

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Cornelia Li for NPR

Forgetting And Forgotten: Older Prisoners Seek Release But Fall Through The Cracks

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New York Rep. Elise Stefanik, seen here at the U.S. Capitol during the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump on Jan. 23, is poised to replace Rep. Liz Cheney as the No. 3 Republican in the House. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Et Tu, Elise? Cheney Set To Lose Leadership Job To Rep. Who Nominated Her For It

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Then-Carlyle Group President Glenn Youngkin is seen during a 2017 panel. The first-time political candidate is the Republican nominee for governor in Virginia. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

This 16-year-old got a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 shot late last month at the UCI Health Family Health Center in Anaheim, Calif. Students as young as 12 are now eligible to get the vaccine, too, the FDA says. Paul Bersebach/MediaNews Group/Orange County Register via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Bersebach/MediaNews Group/Orange County Register via Getty Images

California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks during a press conference in Oakland, Calif., on Monday where he announced a new round of $600 stimulus checks residents making up to $75,000 a year. Newsom also announced a projected $75.7 billion budget surplus compared to last year's projected $54.3 billion shortfall. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Facing A Recall And A Massive Surplus, Gov. Newsom Proposes More Stimulus Checks

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The Hollywood Foreign Press Association voted last week to approve an overhaul proposal but the group's pledges of transformation have done little to reassure entertainment companies. Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Hollywood Forei hide caption

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Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Hollywood Forei

A member of a pro-Trump mob bashes an entrance of the Capitol building in an attempt to gain access on Jan. 6. The U.S. Capitol Police's inspector general has pointed to intelligence failures in the lead-up to the insurrection. Jon Cherry/Getty Images hide caption

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Jon Cherry/Getty Images

A doctor prepares to administer a vaccine injection at New York-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital in Bronxville, N.Y., in January. The Food and Drug Administration has approved emergency use authorization of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine for patients ages 12 to 15. Kevin Hagen/AP hide caption

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Kevin Hagen/AP

City Council candidate Stanley Martin stands in front of an informal memorial to Daniel Prude in Rochester, N.Y. Prude was a man with mental health and drug issues who died last year after being taken into police custody. Mustafa Hussain for NPR hide caption

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Mustafa Hussain for NPR

Rochester, N.Y., Wants To Reimagine Police. What Do People Imagine That Means?

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Thea Lee was named head of the Labor Department's Bureau of International Labor Affairs, which enforces trade commitments and investigates forced labor and child labor around the world. U.S. Department of Labor hide caption

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U.S. Department of Labor