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Taiwan's Foreign Minister Joseph Wu, shown at a news conference last November, says he sees the possibility of closer relations with the U.S. Sam Yeh/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Yeh/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump, pictured on the South Lawn of the White House on Tuesday, signed an executive order on certain training about race for federal contractors, expanding an earlier ban on federal employees. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A former CDC official criticizes the agency over its latest reversal, this time in guidance on how the coronavirus is transmitted. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

After Aerosols Misstep, Former CDC Official Criticizes Agency Over Unclear Messaging

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Buildings are engulfed in flames as a wildfire ravages Talent, Ore., on Sept. 8, 2020. Unfounded rumors that left-wing activists were behind the fires went viral on social media, thanks to amplification by conspiracy theorists and the platforms' own design. Kevin Jantzer/AP hide caption

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Kevin Jantzer/AP

Can Circuit Breakers Stop Viral Rumors On Facebook, Twitter?

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Facebook says the fake accounts it removed focused mainly on Southeast Asia. But they also included some content about the U.S. election, which did not gain a large following. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Community members and family wear shirts that read "Nana Ayudame or Nana, help me" in Spanish at a vigil for Carlos Ingram-Lopez on June 25 in Tucson, Ariz. Prosecutors have declined to pursue criminal charges over his death in police custody. Caitlin O'Hara/Getty Images hide caption

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Caitlin O'Hara/Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's guidelines for a safe Halloween during the COVID-19 pandemic include new methods of doing classic spooky activities. ArtMarie/Getty Images hide caption

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Forbes journalist Dan Alexander writes about the president's potential conflicts of interest in White House, Inc. "You can't have a blind trust and have a building that says 'Trump Tower' on the outside of [it]," Alexander says. "How blind is that?" Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

'White House, Inc.' Author: Trump's Businesses Offer 'A Million Potential Conflicts'

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Nurse Kathe Olmstead (right) gives volunteer Melissa Harting an injection in a study of a possible COVID-19 vaccine developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc. Hans Pennink/AP hide caption

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Hans Pennink/AP

With Limited COVID-19 Vaccine Doses, Who Would Get Them First?

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NBA icon Michael Jordan, shown here speaking at a press conference last year, said he is forming a new NASCAR racing team and Bubba Wallace will be the driver. Chuck Burton/AP hide caption

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Chuck Burton/AP

A cardboard cutout of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The late Supreme Court justice was also a pop culture phenomenon. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The U.S. hit a tragic milestone Tuesday, recording more than 200,000 coronavirus deaths. Here, Chris Duncan, whose 75-year-old mother, Constance, died from COVID-19 on her birthday, visits a COVID Memorial Project installation of 20,000 U.S. flags on the National Mall. The flags are on the grounds of the Washington Monument, facing the White House. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

A worker pushes a cart past refrigerators at a Home Depot in Boston in January, before the coronavirus pandemic threw a monkey wrench into the supply and demand of major appliances. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Why It's So Hard To Buy A New Refrigerator These Days

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