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Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms says she'll sign an executive order requiring face coverings in public. She's shown in this 2019 photo speaking in Washington D.C. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

A statue of John Harvard, namesake of the university, overlooks the campus earlier this year. Harvard University joined the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in suing the federal government over its policies on international students Wednesday. Maddie Meyer/Getty Images hide caption

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Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Communication skills used to negotiate safe sex are also useful for setting boundaries while socializing during the COVID-19 pandemic. Above, circles drawn in the grass encourage social distancing at Dolores Park in San Francisco. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

Seattle Mariners players are gearing up for the start of a shortened regular season. At their home ballpark, summer training is underway this week with strict coronavirus restrictions. Tom Goldman/NPR hide caption

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Tom Goldman/NPR

Baseball Summer Camp - Sharpening Skills While Fending Off The Coronavirus

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This light micrograph from the brain of someone who died with Alzheimer's disease shows the plaques and neurofibrillary tangles that are typical of the disease. A glitch that prevents healthy cell structures from transitioning from one phase to the next might contribute to the tangles, researchers say. Jose Luis Calvo/ Science Source hide caption

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Jose Luis Calvo/ Science Source

Face coverings are seen on display in Los Angeles on July 2. California Gov. Gavin Newsom threatened this week to withhold up to $2.5 billion in aid to local police departments that refuse to enforce mask rules and other pandemic-related mandates. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

More States Require Masks In Public As COVID-19 Spreads, But Enforcement Lags

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Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts awaits the arrival of President Trump in the House of Representatives to deliver the State of the Union address in February. Roberts spent one night in the hospital in June after injuring his forehead in a fall. Leah Millis/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Leah Millis/Pool/Getty Images

The sign for J.E.B. Stuart High School in Falls Church, Va., named after the slaveholding Confederate general, photographed in 2017. The name was changed to Justice High School two years ago. Matt Barakat/AP hide caption

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Matt Barakat/AP

President Trump speaks at a Jan. 28 campaign rally in Wildwood, N.J., as Rep. Jeff Van Drew, R-N.J., listens. Trump backed Van Drew after he switched parties. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

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Mel Evans/AP

Patients can get COVID-19 diagnostic and antibody tests at a converted vehicle inspection station in San Antonio, as the state reports a record number of hospitalizations and single-day case increases. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Protesters hold up a lighted sign reading "#sayhername" during a July 2015 vigil for Sandra Bland in Chicago. Bland died in a Texas jail after a traffic stop escalated into a physical confrontation. Authorities said Bland hanged herself, a finding her family disputed. Christian K. Lee/AP hide caption

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Christian K. Lee/AP

Say Her Name: How The Fight For Racial Justice Can Be More Inclusive Of Black Women

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Why U.S. Schools Are Still Segregated — And One Idea To Help Change That

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