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The History Of American Imperialism, From Bloody Conquest To Bird Poop

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British politician Luciana Berger speaks Monday at a news conference to announce the formation of the Independent Group, as seven British members of Parliament quit the Labour Party because of its approach to Brexit and anti-Semitism. Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP hide caption

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Kirsty Wigglesworth/AP

UNOCHA's new set of icons aims to streamline communication in response to humanitarian crises. United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs hide caption

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United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs

Their research is still in early stages, but Kristin Myers (left), a mechanical engineer, and Dr. Joy Vink, an OB-GYN, both at Columbia University, have already learned that cervical tissue is a more complicated mix of material than doctors ever realized. Adrienne Grunwald for NPR hide caption

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Adrienne Grunwald for NPR

Scientific Duo Gets Back To Basics To Make Childbirth Safer

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President Trump speaks in the Rose Garden at the White House on Friday to declare a national emergency in order to build a wall along the southern border. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Andrew McCabe talked about his new memoir with NPR's Morning Edition. Amr Alfiky/NPR hide caption

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Amr Alfiky/NPR

Andrew McCabe, Ex-FBI Deputy, Describes 'Remarkable' Number Of Trump-Russia Contacts

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The Annie Merner Pfeiffer Chapel is seen on the campus of Bennett College in Greensboro, N.C. The college, one of two historically black colleges for women, is fighting to maintain its accreditation. Bennett College hide caption

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Bennett College

Facing Loss Of Accreditation Over Finances, Women's HBCU Raises Millions

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A man walks amid rubble in the Syrian town of Douma in April 2018. A report out Sunday confirmed that a chemical attack early that month was one of hundreds since the start of the Syrian civil war. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Hassan Ammar/AP

Wim Janssen, one of the musicians involved in the recording project, plays a viola made by master luthier Girolamo Amati in 1615. Courtesy of Native Instruments hide caption

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Courtesy of Native Instruments

NASA astronaut Anne McClain, attends her final exam at the Gagarin Cosmonauts' Training Centre outside Moscow on Nov. 14, 2018. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

'Every Day Is A Good Day When You're Floating': Anne McClain Talks Life In Space

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Former Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke left the Trump administration amid unresolved ethics investigations. His department has been inundated by Freedom of Information requests and is now proposing a new rule which critics charge could limit transparency. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

Interior Dept.'s Push To Limit Public Records Requests Draws Criticism

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Tom and Tamara Conry stand outside their home in Paradise, Calif., which was almost untouched by November's deadly Camp Fire. Their property insurer notified them in December that it would not renew their policy past January. Pauline Bartolone/Capital Public Radio hide caption

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Pauline Bartolone/Capital Public Radio

Their Home Survived The Camp Fire — But Their Insurance Did Not

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