News: U.S. and World News Headlines NPR news, audio, and podcasts. Coverage of breaking stories, national and world news, politics, business, science, technology, and extended coverage of major national and world events.

Current and former tenants are suing Kushner Cos., the real-estate firm owned by the family of President Trump's son-in-law and White House senior adviser, Jared Kushner, for alleged harassment. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Susan Walsh/AP

David Gifford Leathes Prior, Baron Prior of Brampton, is a member of the United Kingdom's House of Lords. His girlfriend says she defaced his house with pig's blood out of anger at an affair he was having with another woman. National Health Service hide caption

toggle caption
National Health Service

In 1994 Nelson Mandela revisited the cell at Robben Island prison where he was jailed for more than two decades. Louise Gubb/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Louise Gubb/Corbis via Getty Images

Nelson Mandela's Prison Letters: 'One Day I Will Be Back At Home'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/629742101/629896571" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Federal Reserve Board Chairman Jerome Powell faced questions before the Senate Banking Committee on Tuesday about the effects of President Trump's trade policies. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jose Luis Magana/AP

Efforts to rebuild the Victoria Islamic Center started within days of an arson attack in January 2017. The Texas mosque is getting closer to being ready to hold services again. Victoria Islamic Center hide caption

toggle caption
Victoria Islamic Center

Protesters duck as Iraqi security forces fire tear gas during a demonstration against unemployment and a lack of basic services in the southern Iraqi city of Basra on Sunday. Haidar Mohammed Ali/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Haidar Mohammed Ali/AFP/Getty Images

Amid Electricity Cuts, Anti-Government Unrest Grows In Southern Iraq

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/629385020/629390406" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker (from left), Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and European Council President Donald Tusk conclude their news conference at the Japan-EU summit on Tuesday in Tokyo. Koji Sasahara/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Koji Sasahara/AP

President Trump's and Russian President Vladimir Putin's summit was a meeting between allies, with convergent interests and common goals, according to a Brookings Institution fellow. Yuri Kadobnov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Yuri Kadobnov/AFP/Getty Images

UCLA researchers are using a radioactive tracer, which binds to abnormal proteins in the brain, to see if it is possible to diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy in living patients. Warmer colors in these PET scans indicate higher concentrations of the tracer. UCLA hide caption

toggle caption
UCLA

Usain Bolt, who retired as the world's greatest sprinter last year, wants to play pro soccer. He's seen here playing during a benefit game this summer, celebrating his score during a penalty shootout. Andrew Boyers/Action Images via Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Boyers/Action Images via Reuters

Crime scene tape surrounds the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas on Oct. 2, 2017. The broken windows show the room where a gunman sat as he opened fire on a country music festival, killing 58 people and wounding more than 500 others. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images