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On Thursday ICE officials confirmed at least six immigrant detainees on a hunger strike are being force-fed through a nasal tube. Salwan Georges/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Salwan Georges/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Soda bottles displayed in a San Francisco market.A federal appeals court blocked a city law requiring advertisement warnings on the potential health impacts of sugary drinks. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Behrouz Boochani, a Kurdish-Iranian journalist and asylum-seeker, won two prestigious Australian literary prizes for his debut, a book composed in text messages sent from a detention center on Manus Island. Hoda Afshar hide caption

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Hoda Afshar

Opposition leader Juan Guaidó talks to the press as he holds his daughter, Miranda, next to his wife, Fabiana Rosales, outside his home in Caracas on Thursday. Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell led the effort to advance an amendment that supports keeping U.S. troops in Syria and Afghanistan to fight ISIS and al-Qaida. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Senate Republicans Rebuke President On Syria And Afghanistan Policy

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NASA's rover Curiosity crawls up the side of Vera Rubin Ridge on Mars' surface in January 2018. Mount Sharp — a 3-mile-high mountain — can be seen in the distance. MSSS/ NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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MSSS/ NASA/JPL-Caltech

Exploring The Mysterious Origins Of Mars' 3-Mile-High Sand Pile

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A U.S. court has ordered the Syrian government to pay $300 million for killing American journalist Marie Colvin in 2012. Colvin is seen here in London in 2010. Arthur Edwards/ WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Arthur Edwards/ WPA Pool/Getty Images

After scientists screened over 8,000 genes in fruit flies, only one, which hadn't been described before, triggered sleepiness. Andrew Syred/Science Source hide caption

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Andrew Syred/Science Source

Could Chinese Telecom Giant Huawei Put U.S. Cyber-Security At Risk?

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The "University of Farmington" occupied office space in this building in Farmington Hills, Mich. In court documents, eight men are accused of recruiting hundreds of "students" to the bogus school. Google Maps/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Google Maps/Screenshot by NPR