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Flowers and a note honor the renowned theoretical physicist near the university church of St. Mary the Great in Cambridge, where a private funeral service was held Saturday. Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis/NPR

A federal judge in Washington, D.C. says that at least for now, the Trump administration can't block undocumented minors in federal care from seeking abortions. Blink O'fanaye/Flickr hide caption

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Blink O'fanaye/Flickr

A Palestinian hurls stones at Israeli troops during clashes at the Gaza-Israel border at a protest demanding the right to return to their homeland, in the southern Gaza Strip. Ibraheem Abu Mustafa/Reuters hide caption

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Ibraheem Abu Mustafa/Reuters

Severe black lung disease deeply scarred the lung of a 61-year-old West Virginia coal miner, which was removed as part of a lung transplant. Courtesy of NIOSH hide caption

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Courtesy of NIOSH

Kentucky Lawmakers Limit Black Lung Claims Reviews Despite Epidemic

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An Iranian woman prays at St. Joseph's Cathedral in Tehran, Iran, a country where Christians and other religious groups have faced persecution. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

100 Iranians Remain Stranded In Austria Awaiting Asylum In The U.S.

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Celestine Shorts' brother, Christopher, was fatally shot last year. She is opposed to the policy and says a courtroom debate about money would be upsetting to her. Bobby Allyn/WHYY hide caption

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Bobby Allyn/WHYY

Philadephia's New DA Wants Prosecutors To Talk Cost Of Incarceration While In Court

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In her new book, Barbara Lipska describes surviving cancer that had spread to her brain, and how the illness changed her cognition, character and, ultimately, her understanding of the mental illnesses she studies. Courtesy of the author hide caption

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Courtesy of the author

'The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind' Returns From Madness

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As a Ph.D. student at Texas A&M University, Mario Suarez is researching ways teachers can help LGBTQ youth. Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT hide caption

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Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT

Coming Out As Transgender Strengthened This Teacher's Commitment To His Students

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Maggie Webb, a junior high school math teacher at Clark Avenue School in Chelsea, Mass., volunteered to teach in a high-needs area in exchange for a federal grant called the TEACH grant. But a new report found that Webb and thousands of others had their grants converted to loans because of seemingly minor issues. Kayana Szymczak for NPR hide caption

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Kayana Szymczak for NPR

Teachers Sarah Lindenberg and Kara Cisco chat with Kelly Brown, the BARR coordinator at St. Louis Park. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

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Elissa Nadworny/NPR

How More Meetings Might Be The Secret To Fixing High School

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Baton Rouge Police Chief Murphy Paul announces the disciplinary decision on the officers who shot Alton Sterling in 2016. Josh Brasted/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Brasted/Getty Images