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British actor Idris Elba played Stringer Bell, second-in-command to Baltimore drug kingpin Avon Barksdale, in HBO's The Wire. Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images hide caption

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Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images

It May Take A British Actor To Make An American Story Sing

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Chenjerai Kumanyika worries that having a "public radio" voice won't allow him to sound like himself. Linda Tindal/Courtesy of Linda Tindal hide caption

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Linda Tindal/Courtesy of Linda Tindal

Challenging The Whiteness Of Public Radio

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Rafael Nadal (right) shakes hands with Tim Smyczek after winning a match at the Australian Open on Jan. 21. Rob Griffith/AP hide caption

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Rob Griffith/AP

The Tennis Court Offers A Good Lesson For The NFL

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Some physicists are pushing back against ideas like string theory and the multiverse. Here, we see a computer-generated image of a black hole, which might, ultimately, be explained by ideas like string theory. Alain Riazuelo/IAP/UPMC/CNRS hide caption

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Alain Riazuelo/IAP/UPMC/CNRS

Shane Fairchild (left) tells his friend Sayer Johnson that his late wife, Blue Bauer, was "the only person I ever met that ever treated me like I was me." StoryCorps hide caption

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StoryCorps

Losing A Soul Mate And A Pillar Of St. Louis' Trans Community

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Chicago Cub Ernie Banks, right, told NPR's Scott Simon, left, in 2014 that he had a lot of fun winning games, but the main thing in his life was "making friends." Peter Breslow/NPR hide caption

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Peter Breslow/NPR

Let's Play Two! Remembering Chicago Cub Ernie Banks

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