Parallels This is the Parallels blog, covering international news.

Friends of Nawaz Atta, a missing activist, accompany his mother at a police station to report the man's disappearance. Atta was taken by armed men in late October. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

Concern Grows In Pakistan Over Cases Of Disappearance

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Secretary of State Rex Tillerson waits to speak at the 2017 Atlantic Council-Korea Foundation Forum in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday. He told the audience the U.S. shouldn't require North Korea to promise to give up its nuclear weapons as a condition of holding talks. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Tillerson's North Korean Overture Highlights His Credibility Problem

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Rahul Gandhi (center), the new president of the Indian National Congress, waves while being garlanded during a political rally at Chilloda village on Nov. 11. Gandhi takes over the party leadership this week from his mother, Sonia Gandhi, who steps down after nearly two decades as the head of the party the Nehru-Gandhi family has dominated for 70 years. Sam Panthaky/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Panthaky/AFP/Getty Images

Children stand at attention on the first day of school in Hong Kong in 2015. Education is increasingly becoming a political battleground. Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Philippe Lopez/AFP/Getty Images

Worries Grow In Hong Kong As China Pushes Its Official Version Of History In Schools

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Rohingya activist Abdul Rasheed says his people can only be repatriated back to their homes in Myanmar if the government can guarantee their safety, security and dignity. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Zimbabwean Pastor Evan Mawarire, acquitted recently of trying to subvert the government, has deftly used social media in a quest for justice and rights. "It's important that we let the administration that is coming in right now know that if they do to us what Robert Mugabe's government did to us, we will do the same thing to them that we've done to Robert Mugabe," he recently told journalists. Mujahid Safodien/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mujahid Safodien/AFP/Getty Images

'Fight For Rights Will Continue' In Zimbabwe, #ThisFlag Movement Pastor Vows

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A sign warns people not to enter the town of Ozersk, Chelyabinsk region, Russia, which houses the Mayak nuclear facility. In 1957, the nuclear reprocessing plant was the site of one of the world's worst nuclear accidents. Katherine Jacobsen/AP hide caption

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Katherine Jacobsen/AP

Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal waves during an official visit to the West Bank city of Ramallah in 2014. The Saudi billionaire was detained last month in Riyadh and has not been seen since. Abbas Momani/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Abbas Momani/AFP/Getty Images

A Saudi Billionaire's Detention Is Making Some Investors Nervous

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Pieces of cloth that Mansour Omari and other inmates at a notorious Syrian prison used to document the names of the "disappeared" held with them. They made ink out of blood from their bleeding gums and rust from the prison bars. Dylan Collins/Courtesy of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum hide caption

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Dylan Collins/Courtesy of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum

Names Written In Blood And Rust: Documenting Syria's Disappeared

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French pop star Johnny Hallyday on stage at Paris' Palais Des Sports stadium in 1969. Reg Lancaster/Getty Images hide caption

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Reg Lancaster/Getty Images

France Mourns Its Favorite Rock Star, Johnny Hallyday

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A picture taken from the Mount of Olives shows the Old City of Jerusalem with the Dome of the Rock. President Trump on Wednesday recognized Jerusalem as Israel's capital, upending decades of U.S. policy and ignoring dire warnings from Arab and Western allies alike. Ahmad Gharabli/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad Gharabli/AFP/Getty Images

Authorities have given residents in Jiugong Township of Beijing, many of whom are migrant laborers, just days to clear out before they shut off all electricity and water. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

For Decades, China's Laborers Moved To Cities. Now They're Being Forced Out

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Successive American presidents have signed waivers deferring a congressional act calling for the U.S. Embassy to be moved to Jerusalem. President Trump signed such a waiver in June, saying he wanted to give U.S.-brokered Israeli-Palestinian peace efforts a chance to succeed. But in recent days, U.S. officials indicated the president was considering moving the embassy. Oded Balilty/AP hide caption

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Oded Balilty/AP

People eat at a noodle stall at the Han Market in the central Vietnamese city of Danang in November. Vietnamese respondents to the Pew Research Center survey overwhelmingly said life is better than it was 50 years ago. Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images

Ali Abdullah Saleh gave a speech to supporters in Yemen's capital Sanaa on Aug. 24, 2017. He never wavered in his belief that only he could lead the Yemenis, even though he fueled societal divisions by playing enemies off one another to weaken his opposition. Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images

A man gets out of a Volvo 144 to head to a parade in Pyongyang in 2012. In the 1970s, North Korea ordered 1,000 Volvo 144s from Sweden. To this day, the cars have not been paid for. Tanya L. Procyshyn hide caption

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Tanya L. Procyshyn

How 1,000 Volvos Ended Up In North Korea — And Made A Diplomatic Difference

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Dmitri Diliani, a Palestinian member of the Greek Orthodox church, stands on the roof of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Jerusalem overlooking the Church of the Holy Sepulcher, which houses the traditional tomb of Jesus. Daniel Estrin/NPR hide caption

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Daniel Estrin/NPR

U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Paul Funk (left), and Iraqi Maj. Gen. Najm Abdullah al-Jibouri, walk through a busy market in Mosul, Iraq, on Oct. 4. U.S. forces in Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan have been increasing this year under President Trump, going from about 18,000 at the beginning of the year to 26,000 recently, according to Pentagon figures. Spc. Avery Howard/AP hide caption

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Spc. Avery Howard/AP

Residents of Salzigitter shop at the local mall. Officials say their community and its resources are being overwhelmed by refugees, most of them from Syria. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

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Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR