Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe addresses supporters at his party headquarters on Nov. 8. Jekesai Njikizana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jekesai Njikizana/AFP/Getty Images

A "comfort woman" statue is placed on a bus seat to mark the 5th International Memorial Day for Comfort Women in Seoul in August. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

'Comfort Woman' Memorial Statues, A Thorn In Japan's Side, Now Sit On Korean Buses

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Supporters of Saad Hariri hold up placards demanding his return from Saudi Arabia at the starting line of Beirut's annual marathon on Sunday. Rumors have swirled that he is being held in Saudi Arabia against his will. Anwar Amro/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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After Lebanese Leader's TV Appearance, Doubts Grow About His Future — And Lebanon's

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Asian leaders and President Trump pose for a photo during the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Summit in Manila on Monday. Manan Vatsyayana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Last summer, South Koreans left messages of their sexual harassment and assaults on Post-it notes at an exit of Gangnam subway station. Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images

China's President Xi Jinping speaks during a business leaders' event with President Trump in Beijing on Thursday. Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammed bin Salman, now Saudi Arabia's crown prince, meets with President Trump in the Oval Office on March 14. Crown Prince Mohammed is seen as the driving force behind the kingdom's aggressive campaign to counter Iran throughout the Middle East. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Several thousand Italians marched in an anti-migrant rally in Rome in October. Sylvia Poggioli/NPR hide caption

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Sylvia Poggioli/NPR

In Italy, Right-Wing Politicians Set Their Sights On Parliament

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Masoud Barzani stepped down last week as president of Iraq's Kurdistan regional government. The independence referendum he pushed through resulted in a military attack by Iraqi forces. But, he tells NPR, "I am very proud that we have given the opportunity for the Kurdish people to express their vote." He says the region will reassess its relationship with the U.S. Jane Arraf/NPR hide caption

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Jane Arraf/NPR

After Iraqi Kurdish Independence Vote Backfires, 'I Do Not Regret It,' Says Barzani

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Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman attends the Future Investment Initiative conference in Riyadh last month. "We are returning to what we were before — a country of moderate Islam that is open to all religions and to the world," he said at the economic forum. Fayez Nureldine/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Xi Jinping (center) approaches the podium as other members of the Communist Party's new Politburo Standing Committee applaud on Wednesday. Xi unveiled a new leadership lineup that included no clear potential successors, raising questions about whether he might seek to stay in office beyond 2022. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Among China's New Leaders, The One Person Missing Is A Clear Successor To Xi Jinping

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte meets Defense Secretary Jim Mattis Oct. 24 at the 11th Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Defense Ministers' Meeting at the former Clark Air Base outside Manila. Dondi Tawatao/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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With Mattis Trip To Philippines, Reminders Of Waning U.S. Influence In Region

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Chinese President Xi Jinping delivers a speech at the opening ceremony of the 19th Party Congress held at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing last week. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

What Motivates Chinese President Xi Jinping's Anti-Corruption Drive?

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Rohingya Muslim refugees in Bangladesh wait to receive food distributed by a Turkish aid agency at a refugee camp on Saturday. Tauseef Mustafa/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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U.N. Rights Chief: Myanmar's Treatment Of Rohingya Includes 'Almost ISIS-Type Crimes'

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Japanese Prime Minister and ruling party president Shinzo Abe smiles after the general election Sunday in Tokyo in which his ruling party won a clear majority. The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images hide caption

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Japan's Prime Minister Isn't Popular, But His Coalition Won A Supermajority

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Chinese President Xi Jinping has cracked down on corruption — and dissent. Lintao Zhang/Getty Images hide caption

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For Clues To China's Crackdown On Public Expression, Look To Its Economy

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China's President Xi Jinping gives a speech at the opening session of the Chinese Communist Party Congress on Wednesday. Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A poster in Beijing features Chinese President Xi Jinping and a slogan reading "Chinese Dream, People's Dream." Xi is preparing to embark on a second five-year term this week. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Monovithya Kem's father, Cambodian opposition leader Kem Sokha, was jailed in September, after his party fared better than expected in local elections in June. "Dictators see free, fair elections as a threat," she tells NPR. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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'Fear Is Something Constant,' Says Daughter Of Jailed Cambodian Opposition Leader

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