Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

Parallels

Many Stories, One World

Politics & Policy

Brazilian slave laborers stop their work to listen to a Labor Ministry inspector explain their legal rights, on the Bom Jesus farm in the Amazon basin in 2003. Rickey Rogers/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Rickey Rogers/Reuters /Landov

Supporters of Tunisia's secular Popular Front on Tuesday celebrate the third anniversary of the ouster of dictator Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali. The country is on the verge of approving a new constitution that was negotiated by Islamist and secular political parties. Anis Mili/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Anis Mili/Reuters /Landov

Tunisians wave their national flag and shout slogans on Tuesday in the capital, Tunis, as they attend a rally marking the third anniversary of the uprising that ousted longtime dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images

Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff speaks in Sao Paulo on Dec. 19, framed by posters held by protesters calling for asylum for National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden. Andre Penner/AP hide caption

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Andre Penner/AP

Even In Snowden-Friendly Brazil, Asylum May Be 'Bridge Too Far'

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A November demonstration against Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's Designated Secrets Bill drew thousands of protesters. The Japanese Parliament has since passed the law, under which people convicted of leaking classified information will face five to 10 years in prison. Franck Robichon/European Pressphoto Agency/Landov hide caption

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Franck Robichon/European Pressphoto Agency/Landov

Laura and Thanos Ntoumanis recently moved from Greece to Germany, where Thanos, a psychiatrist, got a job. Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis/NPR

With Its Economy Hobbled, Greece's Well-Educated Drain Away

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Soldiers on camels take part in a military parade on Qatar's National Day in the capital Doha last Wednesday. The city's rapidly growing skyline is in the background. Despite its small size, Qatar has used its wealth to play an outsized role in regional affairs. Chen Shaojin/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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Chen Shaojin/Xinhua/Landov

David Bahati, a member of Uganda's Parliament, is interviewed in 2011. Bahati was the driving force behind a controversial anti-gay bill that was approved Friday. Ronald Kabuubi/AP hide caption

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Ronald Kabuubi/AP

Uganda Passes Anti-Gay Bill That Includes Life In Prison

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Chief Justice Iftikhar Chaudhry (center) is greeted by lawyers in Islamabad after the government announced it would reinstate him, in March 2009. Pakistan's longest-serving chief justice challenged the status quo and fought to chart a more assertive and independent course for the country's judiciary. Anjum Naveed/AP hide caption

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Anjum Naveed/AP

Vitali Klitschko, head of the opposition UDAR party, waves a flag during a rally in downtown Kiev, Ukraine, on Dec. 1. The WBC heavyweight boxing champion has emerged as one of Ukraine's most popular political figures, as massive anti-government protests grip the country. Sergei Grits/AP hide caption

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Sergei Grits/AP

If a plan taking shape is finalized, the MV Cape Ray, managed by the U.S. Department of Transportation, will be turned into a floating chemical weapons disposal plant. U.S. Department of Transportation Maritime Administration hide caption

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U.S. Department of Transportation Maritime Administration

Inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency are scheduled to visit Iran's heavy-water reactor in the city of Arak on Sunday as part of an international deal on the country's nuclear program. Hamid Forutan/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Hamid Forutan/EPA/Landov

Supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood run from tear gas during clashes with riot police near Cairo's Rabaa al-Adawiya square on Nov. 22. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

The High Price Egyptians Pay For Opposing Their Rulers

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A young Afghan balloon seller runs toward a customer in Kabul on April 2. Afghanistan, North Korea and Somalia are the most-corrupt countries, according to the annual Corruption Perception Index released Tuesday. Massoud Hossaini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Massoud Hossaini/AFP/Getty Images