Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

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Politics & Policy

Scientists and engineers work on the Mars Orbiter at the Indian Space Research Organisation's satellite center in Bangalore, India, on Sept. 11. The spacecraft is scheduled to be launched sometime in the next three weeks. Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images

Demonstrators who are critical of the Catholic Church and favor abortion rights take part in a protest in Rio de Janeiro during Pope Francis' visit to Brazil on July 27. Abortion is illegal in Brazil with rare exceptions. Some lawmakers are attempting to make it even more restrictive. Tasso Marcelo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasso Marcelo/AFP/Getty Images

Brazil's Restrictions On Abortion May Get More Restrictive

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President Obama and German Chancellor Angela Merkel at a news conference in Berlin in June. A German newspaper reported Sunday that Obama had known since 2010 that his intelligence service was eavesdropping on Merkel. The story came a day after reports alleged Obama told Merkel he was not aware she was being spied on. Kevin Lamarque/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Kevin Lamarque/Reuters /Landov

The U.S. ambassador to Spain, James Costos, leaves the Spanish Foreign Ministry after being summoned to a meeting in Madrid on Monday. He was called in following reports that the NSA was tracking millions of phone calls in Spain. Juan Medina/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Juan Medina/Reuters /Landov

In this photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, ousted Chinese politician Bo Xilai stands before the Shandong Provincial Higher People's Court. The court upheld Bo's conviction and life sentence for corruption and abuse of power. Xie Huanchi/AP hide caption

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Xie Huanchi/AP

Massive government surveillance of Americans' phone and Internet activity is drawing protests from civil liberties groups, but major legal obstacles stand in the way of any full-blown court hearing on the practice. Among them: government claims that national security secrets will be revealed if the cases are allowed to proceed. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Secretary of State John Kerry, shown in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia in June, has acknowledged the recent tensions between the U.S. and Saudi Arabia, two countries that are normally close allies. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Why Is Saudi Arabia Bickering With The U.S.?

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Relatives of He Mengqing walk in front of his house, which the local government has slated for demolition. The rice farmer from Chenzhou in China's Hunan province rejected a government offer of compensation for his land; he set himself on fire when officials came for him. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

U.S. Ambassador to France Charles Rivkin (in red tie) leaves the Foreign Ministry in Paris after being summoned Monday following reports that the National Security Agency spied on French citizens. Thibault Camus/AP hide caption

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Thibault Camus/AP

A worker walks inside the turbine hall of the Sizewell nuclear plant in eastern England in 2006. The U.K. government on Monday announced that French-owned EDF would build the first new British nuclear power station in 20 years. Lefteris Pitarakis/AP hide caption

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Lefteris Pitarakis/AP

A sign outside the National Security Agency campus in Fort Meade, Md. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

You Have Questions About The NSA; We Have Answers

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Migrants arrive in Valletta, the Maltese capital, aboard a patrol boat on Oct. 12, a day after their boat sank, killing more than 30 people, mostly women and children — just the latest deadly migrant tragedy to hit the Mediterranean. Despite Europe's financial crisis illegal immigrants continue to attempt to enter Europe through its southern coastal countries as they seek a better life. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Leonarda Dibrani, 15, holds her sister, Medina, in Mitrovica, Kosovo, on Friday. Police seized Leonarda from a school field trip last week and expelled her and her family from France. The case has prompted protests across France. Vusar Kryeziu/AP hide caption

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Vusar Kryeziu/AP

In France, Deportation Of Teenage Girl Ignites Fierce Debate

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A physician collects medical equipment and medicines from the remains of the partially destroyed Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque compound hospital in Cairo on Aug. 15. Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images