Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

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Politics & Policy

A picture taken on April 20, 2010, shows a Russian nuclear-capable Iskander ballistic missile launcher during a military parade rehearsal outside Moscow. Russia transferred Iskander-M missile launchers within range of three Baltic states earlier this month. Alexander Nemenov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Nemenov/AFP/Getty Images

'A Dangerous Situation' As U.S.-Russia Tensions Spill Over To Nuclear Pacts

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U.S. Ambassador to China Max Baucus, a former Montana senator, recently became the first American envoy to China to visit all of the country's provinces. "We Americans have an obligation to come to China, to learn more about China," he tells NPR. "Why? Because with each passing day, it's going to be more and more in our future." Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

U.S. Envoy: China Will Be 'More And More In Our Future'

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A man watches a TV news program showing a file image of missile launch conducted by North Korea, at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, on Oct. 20. The U.S. military said it detected a failed North Korean missile launch that day. The U.S. Strategic Command issued a statement late Wednesday saying it presumed the missile was a Musudan intermediate-range ballistic missile. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

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Lee Jin-man/AP

Even With Failures, North Korea's Nuclear Program Races Ahead

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A man takes a selfie near a picture of Chinese President Xi Jinping at an exhibition at a military museum in Beijing on Monday. Xi is expected to use an important meeting this week to re-emphasize his anti-graft campaign. Analysts say the campaign is also used to go after rival factions within the Communist Party. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

Behind China's Anti-Graft Campaign, A Drive To Crush Rivals

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Chinese President Xi Jinping (center) holds a welcome ceremony for visiting Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte before their talks in Beijing on Oct. 20. In remarks during his visit, Duterte said, "I announce my separation from the United States. Both in military, not maybe social, but economics also." Xinhua News Agency/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency/Xinhua News Agency/Getty Images

Demanding Greater Respect From U.S., Philippines Looks To China

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Demonstrators in favor of abortion rights (left) shout at an anti-abortion activist at a rally in Santiago, Chile, on March 21. Chile is one of the few countries that ban abortion in all circumstances. Lawmakers are working on a measure that would allow abortions in some cases. But many religious conservatives say the current law should remain. Esteban Felix/AP hide caption

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Esteban Felix/AP

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas speaks in the West Bank town of Bethlehem on Oct. 1. Several days later, Abbas, 81, underwent an urgent cardiac test, but was soon released. The health scare has increased talk about a possible successor as the Palestinian leader. Majdi Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Majdi Mohammed/AP

Teodoro Nguema Obiang Mangue, the vice president of Equatorial Guinea and son of the president, cuts his birthday cake in 2010. The Justice Department says he went on a $100 million shopping spree in the U.S. with money stolen from his homeland. Some $30 million was recovered. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

When Kleptocrats Bring Money Into The U.S., There's Now A Plan To Seize It

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Claudia Mo, a Hong Kong legislator, expects a new group of young lawmakers in Hong Kong to push back against mainland China. "I think Hong Kong will become even more vibrant on the political front," she says. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

Hong Kong Wrestles With An Identity Crisis

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte speaks during a news conference at the airport in Davao City, prior to his departure for the ASEAN summit on Sept. 5. He called President Obama a "son of a bitch" and warned him not to question extrajudicial killings in the Philippines' war on drugs. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Why Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte Distrusts The U.S.

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Zimbabwe's riot police clash with protesters who oppose the introduction of bond notes by the country's Reserve Bank, in the capital, Harare, on Aug. 17. The bank says the notes will be equivalent to the U.S. dollar, which serves as the country's main currency. But the announcement has prompted many to withdraw their U.S. dollars from banks. Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP hide caption

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Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP

The U.S. Dollar Is Zimbabwe's Main Currency, And It's Disappearing Fast

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte addresses army troops near Manila on Tuesday. As the U.S. and the Philippines began annual military exercises, the president said it might be for the last time, adding that, "Mr. Obama, you can go to hell." Bullit Marquez/AP hide caption

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Bullit Marquez/AP

He Did It Again: Philippine President Keeps Insulting The U.S. (And Obama)

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Nathan Law, 23, is a former leader of Hong Kong's 2014 Umbrella Movement protests against China. Now he is the city's youngest legislator ever, and says he will support additional protests against the mainland. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

At 23, Hong Kong Lawmaker Promises Feisty Protests Aimed At China

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Russian President Vladimir Putin heads a meeting on the budget in the Kremlin on Sept. 26. Alexei Nikolsky/AP hide caption

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Alexei Nikolsky/AP

Amid Deteriorating U.S.-Russia Relations, Questions Grow About Cyberwar

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