Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

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Politics & Policy

British police dog handlers patrol a train station in London in January. Matt Dunham/AP hide caption

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Matt Dunham/AP

Is A British Program Spotting Radicals Or Alienating Muslims?

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Beijing's chronic high pollution has forced residents to adjust to living with the haze. China is the world's biggest greenhouse gas emitter, but until recently, the government treated air pollution and climate change as separate issues, saying climate change was a Western problem. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

China's Greenhouse Gases Don't Seem To Trouble Most Of Its Citizens

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Francisco Carlos Fonseca is the manager of Marina Confiança, a resort located on the banks of the Cantareira reservoir system. Behind him is a boat ramp that once led to a lake that he says used to be more than 100 feet deep. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

As Brazil's Largest City Struggles With Drought, Residents Are Leaving

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Pakistani women queue to cast their ballots last month at a polling station during local government elections in Lahore, one of the country's biggest cities. In other areas, local tradition can prevent women from voting. JAMIL AHMED/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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JAMIL AHMED/Xinhua /Landov

Canada has pledged to accept 25,000 Syrian refugees, likely including women, children and injured people who have been living in camps in Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan. Here, children stand outside their tents during a sandstorm, in a refugee camp in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley in September. Bilal Hussein/AP hide caption

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Bilal Hussein/AP

Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak waves the Malaysian flag during National Day celebrations on Aug. 31. He has faced widespread criticism and protests over allegations that huge sums disappeared from a government-owned investment fund. Joshua Paul/AP hide caption

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Joshua Paul/AP

Malaysian Leader Faces Corruption Scandal As He Prepares To Meet Obama

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Supporters of Myanmar's National League for Democracy cheer as election results are posted outside party headquarters in Yangon, Myanmar's capital. Aung San Suu Kyi and other opposition leaders have tried to temper the celebrations, in anticipation of having to form a coalition — and contend with the military. Mark Baker/AP hide caption

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Mark Baker/AP

Amid Slow Vote Count, Myanmar Opposition 'Cautiously' Eyes Victory

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Ivo Cassol is a prominent Brazilian senator from the western state of Rondonia in the Amazon. He made his fortune in timber and cattle ranching. Environmentalists say these activities are responsible for much of the deforestation in the rain forest. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

The Amazon, As It Looks To A Man Who Made His Fortune There

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Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi says she will be "above the president" if her party wins Sunday's election. In a constitutional clause that appears directed at her, a person can't become president if he or she is married to a foreign national or has children who are foreign nationals. Suu Kyi's late husband was British, as are their two sons. Mark Baker/AP hide caption

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Mark Baker/AP

Chinese President Xi Jinping, right, and Taiwanese President Ma Ying-jeou, left, shake hands at the start of a historic meeting. The moment marks the first top-level contact between the formerly-bitter Cold War foes in 66 years. Wong Maye-E/AP hide caption

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Wong Maye-E/AP

Historic Handshake: China, Taiwan Leaders Meet For First Time In 66 Years

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Taiwanese presidential front-runner Tsai Ing-wen's party has called for independence from China in the past. This time around, it's signaling pragmatism. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

As Taiwan Gears Up For Elections, China, As Always, Looms Large

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Asylum-seekers gather outside a camp on the island of Lesbos where they're supposed to be screened quickly. But sometimes the wait can last days. Jodi Hilton hide caption

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Jodi Hilton

To Keep Track Of Migrants, EU Sets Up 'Hot Spots'

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Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin (left), and Palestinian leader leader Yasser Arafat reach an interim agreement as President Clinton looks on at the White house on Sept. 28, 1995. Rabin was killed by an extremist Jew five weeks later. DOUG MILLS/AP hide caption

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DOUG MILLS/AP

20 Years Later, The Question Lingers: What If Yitzhak Rabin Had Lived?

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Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and South Korean President Park Geun-hye walk to their seats for the start of a trilateral meeting with the U.S. in 2014. Japan and Korea's leaders have yet to meet one-on-one. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

For China, Japan And S. Korea, Just Meeting Is An Accomplishment

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