Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

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Politics & Policy

People wait to see President Obama on his way to make a televised address to the Cuban people in Havana on March 22. President Obama's opening to Cuba was carried out largely by executive orders that could be reversed when Donald Trump enters the White House. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

How Trump Could Easily Reverse Obama's Opening To Cuba

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Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg (left) met in Istanbul Monday. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Stark Choice For NATO's Turkish Officers: Arrests At Home, Limbo In Europe

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Marion Chabrel (center), 37, has taken in two migrants as roommates, Brahim (left), from Bangladesh, and Shabada (right) from Afghanistan. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

For Newly Arrived Migrants, Paris Offers An Upgraded Welcome

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Haitian nationals at a Mexican government immigration office near the port of entry between Nogales, Sonora, Mexico, and Nogales, Ariz., wait day after day for appointments with U.S. immigration agents so they can enter. As a result of the Haitian influx and a continuing surge of Central Americans on the Texas-Mexico border, the U.S. government has run out of detention space. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

At The U.S.-Mexico Border, Haitians Arrive To A Harsh Reception

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President-elect Donald Trump gestures during a visit to the golf course he owns in Turnberry, Scotland, on July 31, 2015. As president, Trump will face foreign policy decisions that are likely to have an impact on his extensive international holdings, but he says he has no plans to sell his foreign business interests. Scott Heppell/AP hide caption

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Scott Heppell/AP

Participants at the Marrakech climate conference stage a public show of support for climate negotiations and the Paris agreement on Friday. David Keyton/AP hide caption

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David Keyton/AP

As Marrakech Climate Talks End, Worries Remain About U.S. Pullout

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Retired Army Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn spoke at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland in August in support of Donald Trump. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Both Israel and Palestinians claim Jerusalem as capital. No country maintains an embassy in the city. yeowatzup/Flickr hide caption

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Trump Favors Moving U.S. Embassy To Jerusalem, Despite Backlash Fears

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Then-Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and North Korean leader Kim Jong Il toast in Pyongyang on Oct. 24, 2000. The U.S. and North Korea signed an agreement six years earlier to curb North Korea's nuclear activities in exchange for aid, but it collapsed in 2002, during the Bush administration. Chien-Min Chung/AP hide caption

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Chien-Min Chung/AP

Will Iran Deal Meet The Same Fate As A Past U.S.-North Korean Arms Deal?

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A counterdemonstrator holds a sign during a gathering in New York City to show solidarity with Syrian and Iraqi refugees last year. Donald Trump's hard-line campaign rhetoric singled out Syrian refugees. "If I win," he told a New Hampshire rally, "they are going back." Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

For Refugees And Advocates, An Anxious Wait For Clarity On Trump's Policy

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The U.S. Naval Station at Guantanamo holds the U.S. prison known as "Gitmo." President Obama said when he took office in 2009 that he wanted to close the prison, but 60 prisoners remain. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Trump Has Vowed To Fill Guantanamo With 'Some Bad Dudes' — But Who?

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Retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn appeared with Donald Trump during a town hall on Sept. 6 in Virginia Beach, Va. The former Defense Intelligence Agency boss is a Trump national security insider. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Syrian President Bashar Assad (left) and Russian President Vladimir Putin shake hands at the Kremlin in October 2015. U.S. President-elect Donald Trump faces many foreign policy challenges, which will include dealing with the war in Syria and friction with Russia. Alexei Druzhinin/AP hide caption

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Alexei Druzhinin/AP