Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

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Politics & Policy

A November demonstration against Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's Designated Secrets Bill drew thousands of protesters. The Japanese Parliament has since passed the law, under which people convicted of leaking classified information will face five to 10 years in prison. Franck Robichon/European Pressphoto Agency/Landov hide caption

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Franck Robichon/European Pressphoto Agency/Landov

Laura and Thanos Ntoumanis recently moved from Greece to Germany, where Thanos, a psychiatrist, got a job. Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis/NPR

With Its Economy Hobbled, Greece's Well-Educated Drain Away

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Soldiers on camels take part in a military parade on Qatar's National Day in the capital Doha last Wednesday. The city's rapidly growing skyline is in the background. Despite its small size, Qatar has used its wealth to play an outsized role in regional affairs. Chen Shaojin/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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Chen Shaojin/Xinhua/Landov

David Bahati, a member of Uganda's Parliament, is interviewed in 2011. Bahati was the driving force behind a controversial anti-gay bill that was approved Friday. Ronald Kabuubi/AP hide caption

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Ronald Kabuubi/AP

Uganda Passes Anti-Gay Bill That Includes Life In Prison

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Chief Justice Iftikhar Chaudhry (center) is greeted by lawyers in Islamabad after the government announced it would reinstate him, in March 2009. Pakistan's longest-serving chief justice challenged the status quo and fought to chart a more assertive and independent course for the country's judiciary. Anjum Naveed/AP hide caption

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Anjum Naveed/AP

Vitali Klitschko, head of the opposition UDAR party, waves a flag during a rally in downtown Kiev, Ukraine, on Dec. 1. The WBC heavyweight boxing champion has emerged as one of Ukraine's most popular political figures, as massive anti-government protests grip the country. Sergei Grits/AP hide caption

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Sergei Grits/AP

If a plan taking shape is finalized, the MV Cape Ray, managed by the U.S. Department of Transportation, will be turned into a floating chemical weapons disposal plant. U.S. Department of Transportation Maritime Administration hide caption

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U.S. Department of Transportation Maritime Administration

Inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency are scheduled to visit Iran's heavy-water reactor in the city of Arak on Sunday as part of an international deal on the country's nuclear program. Hamid Forutan/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Hamid Forutan/EPA/Landov

Supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood run from tear gas during clashes with riot police near Cairo's Rabaa al-Adawiya square on Nov. 22. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

The High Price Egyptians Pay For Opposing Their Rulers

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A young Afghan balloon seller runs toward a customer in Kabul on April 2. Afghanistan, North Korea and Somalia are the most-corrupt countries, according to the annual Corruption Perception Index released Tuesday. Massoud Hossaini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Massoud Hossaini/AFP/Getty Images

Two U.S. B-52s, like the one shown here, have flown through an area that China says is within its air defense zone. China's announcement has irked its neighbors and the U.S. and Japan say they won't abide by it. Andy Rain /EPA/Landov hide caption

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Andy Rain /EPA/Landov

Computer screens display a map showing the outline of China's new air defense zone in the East China on the website of the Chinese Ministry of Defense, in Beijing. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

Givot Olam CEO Tovia Luskin expects to drill 40 wells and build a pipeline to a refinery on the coast. The company already has "proven and probable" reserves of 12.5 million barrels of oil. Luskin chose where to drill based on a passage from the Bible. Emily Harris/ NPR hide caption

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Emily Harris/ NPR

Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond presents the White Paper for Scottish independence at the Science Museum Glasgow on Tuesday. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images