Politics & Policy : Parallels U.S. policy can change the course of another country and, increasingly, the reverse is true. From social issues to geopolitical strategy, we connect the dots — and seek out possible lessons for the future.

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Politics & Policy

Hissene Habre, the former president of Chad, waves as he leaves a courthouse in Dakar, Senegal, on June 3. Habre was ousted from Chad in 1990 and has lived in exile in Senegal ever since. He was arrested in 2013 and is now on trial for charges that include torture, war crimes and crimes against humanity. Seyllou/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Seyllou/AFP/Getty Images

An Ex-Dictator Faces Trial — But Not In The Country He Ruled

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A U.S. Coast Guard crew (foreground) with six Cubans who were picked up in the Florida Straits in May. A larger Coast Guard vessel is in the background. The number of Cubans trying to reach the U.S. has soared in the past year. Many Cubans believe it will be more difficult to enter the U.S. as relations improve, though U.S. officials say there will be no rule changes in the near term. Tony Winton/AP hide caption

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Tony Winton/AP

Cuban Immigrants Flow Into The U.S., Fearing The Rules Will Change

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Iran's President Hassan Rouhani leaves after a televised speech in Tehran on Dec. 16. Iran has been dismantling parts of its nuclear program as required under an international deal, and some sanctions could be lifted as soon as January. Ebrahim Noroozi/AP hide caption

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Ebrahim Noroozi/AP

Iran Sanctions Could Be Lifted As Soon As January

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During a Dec. 5 protest against new highway fees in Moscow, a Russian Communist Party supporter stood in front of a banner with portraits of wealthy businessmen including billionaire Arkady Rotenberg, far left. Rotenberg's son, Igor Rotenberg, controls the business operating the new road fee system. Sergei Ilnitsky/EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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Sergei Ilnitsky/EPA /LANDOV

In A Rare Protest, Russian Truckers Rally Against Putin's Highway Tax

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Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau welcomed Syrian refugees arriving from Beirut at the Toronto airport last week. Mark Blinch/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Mark Blinch/Reuters /Landov

As Syrian Refugees Reach Canada, Many Are Pitching In

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President Paul Kagame posted his ballot in Kigali on Friday as Rwandans voted in a referendum to decide whether he should be allowed to extend his time in power. AP hide caption

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AP

Rwanda's President Dangles The Possibility Of A Third Term

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China's Cyberspace Administration minister Lu Wei (second from right) and other officials attend the opening ceremony of the Light of the Internet Expo on Tuesday as part of the Second World Internet Conference, which starts Wednesday. Lu has said that controlling the Internet is about as easy as "nailing Jell-O to the wall." Xu Yu/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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Xu Yu/Xinhua /Landov

China's Internet Forum May Provide A Peek At Its Cyber-Ambitions

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Candidate Sameera abu al-Shamat votes in Saudi Arabia's municipal elections on Saturday. Shamat did not win a seat. Deborah Amos / NPR hide caption

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Deborah Amos / NPR

Saudi Women: Elections Are One Step Forward On A Long Road

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Supporters of Venezuelan opposition leader Leopoldo Lopez shout "Freedom for Leopoldo" outside a court in Caracas in September. Lopez, Venezuela's best known political prisoner, was arrested and sentenced to nearly 14 years in prison after giving a speech at a demonstration last year. Fernando Llano/AP hide caption

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Fernando Llano/AP

Winning Big, Venezuela's Opposition Now Plans Push For Prisoner Release

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A demonstrator wears a box that reads in Spanish, "Salary raise now," during a protest by university professors and students at Venezuela's Central University in Caracas on May 28. A typical professor's salary is now worth the equivalent of $35 a month due to runaway inflation. Leading public universities have been closed due to strikes since September. Fernando Llano/AP hide caption

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Fernando Llano/AP

Venezuela's University Professors Vote With Their Feet

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Hatoon al-Fassi, a Saudi professor and a leading advocate of women's rights, speaks at a political meeting for women in Riyadh. Deb Amos/NPR hide caption

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Deb Amos/NPR

For Saudi Women, 'Baby Steps Into This World Of Democracy'

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British police dog handlers patrol a train station in London in January. Matt Dunham/AP hide caption

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Matt Dunham/AP

Is A British Program Spotting Radicals Or Alienating Muslims?

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Beijing's chronic high pollution has forced residents to adjust to living with the haze. China is the world's biggest greenhouse gas emitter, but until recently, the government treated air pollution and climate change as separate issues, saying climate change was a Western problem. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

China's Greenhouse Gases Don't Seem To Trouble Most Of Its Citizens

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Francisco Carlos Fonseca is the manager of Marina Confiança, a resort located on the banks of the Cantareira reservoir system. Behind him is a boat ramp that once led to a lake that he says used to be more than 100 feet deep. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

As Brazil's Largest City Struggles With Drought, Residents Are Leaving

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Pakistani women queue to cast their ballots last month at a polling station during local government elections in Lahore, one of the country's biggest cities. In other areas, local tradition can prevent women from voting. JAMIL AHMED/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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JAMIL AHMED/Xinhua /Landov